GWTW Forum

Kite Land Talk => Website Discussion => Topic started by: chilese on August 14, 2011, 12:01 PM



Title: Grammar Police Update
Post by: chilese on August 14, 2011, 12:01 PM
As zippy8 touched on the yoke/yolk recently.....

Here are a few of the grammar/spelling violations topping our charts.
_______________________

your instead of you're

that instead of who  (e.g. He is a person that you can trust.)

axle instead of axel

McNeil instead of McNeill (Ken McNeill, Blue Moon Kites)

Shirley instead of Shirey (Paul Shirey, Aerostar Sport Kites)

Feel free to add to the list any personal favorites.


Title: Re: Grammar Police Update
Post by: RonG on August 14, 2011, 04:26 PM
Chelise instead of Chilese.

I know you were just too polite to mention it.


Title: Re: Grammar Police Update
Post by: RobB on August 14, 2011, 04:30 PM
How about 'PROLLY' instead of probably ?   >:(


Title: Re: Grammar Police Update
Post by: chilese on August 14, 2011, 04:41 PM
Thanks Ron.  :)

It was gnawing away at my innards.  ::)
_______________________________

pry instead of probably. (e.g. I'll PRY go the store after I talk to the guy THAT took my lunch money.)


Title: Re: Grammar Police Update
Post by: Gardner on August 14, 2011, 04:47 PM
"Farther" for "Further"!
The "effect" will "affect" us all.
That's Who?
Gots for Have To
There for Their
To for Too or Also


Title: Re: Grammar Police Update
Post by: fidelio on August 14, 2011, 05:18 PM
 getting your kite out, then having the wind die, would be more fun than having the wind die, then getting your kite out.

then
adverb
1. at that time: Prices were lower then.
2. immediately or soon afterward: The rain stopped and then started again.
3. next in order of time: We ate, then we started home.
4. at the same time: At first the water seemed blue, then gray.
5. next in order of place: Standing beside Charlie is my uncle, then my cousin, then my brother.

than
conjunction
1. (used, as after comparative adjectives and adverbs, to introduce the second member of an unequal comparison): She's taller than I am.
2. (used after some adverbs and adjectives expressing choice or diversity, such as other, otherwise, else, anywhere,  or different,  to introduce an alternative or denote a difference in kind, place, style, identity, etc.): I had no choice other than that. You won't find such freedom anywhere else than in this country.
3. (used to introduce the rejected choice in expressions of preference): I'd rather walk than drive there.
4. except; other than: We had no choice than to return home.
5. when: We had barely arrived than we had to leave again.
preposition
6. in relation to; by comparison with (usually followed by a pronoun in the objective case): He is a person than whom I can imagine no one more courteous.


Title: Re: Grammar Police Update
Post by: MtnFlyer on August 14, 2011, 07:53 PM
You caught me in a mood, so here's one, also.

[ ]  (that's nothing except a space) instead of [.], [,], [!], or some other form of punctuation.


Title: Re: Grammar Police Update
Post by: Allen Carter on August 14, 2011, 08:37 PM
I think you have to separate the intentional from the unintentional from the clueless. Something like prolly is casual slang and used intentionally.


Title: Re: Grammar Police Update
Post by: chilese on August 14, 2011, 08:51 PM
Allen, what do we do with the 3 piles after the separation?  :)


Title: Re: Grammar Police Update
Post by: zippy8 on August 14, 2011, 11:23 PM
As zippy8 touched on the yoke/yolk recently.....

Hey, don't drag me into your hangups. >:(

But..... Axle. (http://www.elisanet.fi/mike.emery/Smilies/No%20no%20no.gif)

Mike.


Title: Re: Grammar Police Update
Post by: RonG on August 15, 2011, 05:09 AM
This thread is really comming along.


Title: Re: Grammar Police Update
Post by: boomertype on August 15, 2011, 01:34 PM
Don't ignore the deadly "me ands"!
You know, "me and John"!
Be polite and put the other person first - don't be a ME AND.

Really old school rule.

Then there is the dreaded WE AT's!
Don't get me started on that one.

And don't forget about buying a "one OF kind".
It doesn't turn into a one OFF.
That one puzzles me, but it's common.


Title: Re: Grammar Police Update
Post by: RonG on August 15, 2011, 01:48 PM
And don't forget about buying a "one OF kind".
It doesn't turn into a one OFF.
That one puzzles me, but it's common.

It's OK, as long as the item in question is very unique.


Title: Re: Grammar Police Update
Post by: Steven L Hall on August 15, 2011, 01:53 PM
One-off is legitimate, and you can blame the Brits for it.


Title: Re: Grammar Police Update
Post by: boomertype on August 15, 2011, 03:06 PM
I thought it was >:( bugger-off the Brits said.


Title: Re: Grammar Police Update
Post by: rncembal on August 15, 2011, 03:34 PM
One of , there is only one
one off,  built one at a time to order


Title: Re: Grammar Police Update
Post by: chilese on August 15, 2011, 05:04 PM
I hear this on the tele quite often.

"you and I" after a preposition.

e.g. The gift is for you and I.
e.g. Just between you and I.





Title: Re: Grammar Police Update
Post by: Lee S on August 15, 2011, 10:29 PM
bridal lines instead of bridle lines
break lines instead of brake lines
excessive apostrophe abuse

What if you break your brake lines :o


Title: Re: Grammar Police Update
Post by: sluggo on August 16, 2011, 07:01 AM
Overuse of apostrophe. It should only used for contractions or possessives (but not used in possessive pronouns "his", "hers", and "its"). Not used for plurals! This includes numbers - it's the 1980s, not the 1980's. Though it could be the '80s.


Title: Re: Grammar Police Update
Post by: sluggo on August 16, 2011, 02:59 PM
oops, sorry for the repeat. Other bugbears:

  • "baited breath"
  • use of "myself" as a non-reflexive object pronoun
  • "would of", "could of", etc
  • misuse of "irony" or "ironic"


Title: Re: Grammar Police Update
Post by: boomertype on August 16, 2011, 04:16 PM
So, let's be honest, when did you ever hear the term IMHO, and realize that it was truely humble???
I've never seen it used without the implication that this is my opinion and you damn will better believe it and live by it, you can take it to the bank.
Just MO (My Opinion).


Title: Re: Grammar Police Update
Post by: justinpwheeler on August 18, 2011, 01:56 PM
So, let's be honest, when did you ever hear the term IMHO, and realize that it was truely humble???
I've never seen it used without the implication that this is my opinion and you damn will better believe it and live by it, you can take it to the bank.
Just MO (My Opinion).

Well, In My Holy Opinion, I never thought it would be humble.

 ;)


Title: Re: Grammar Police Update
Post by: RoyReed on August 30, 2011, 08:17 AM
I thought it was >:( bugger-off the Brits said.
That's only if they like you  :D


Title: Re: Grammar Police Update
Post by: Zach on August 30, 2011, 08:59 AM
These are good for a laugh AND an education!

http://theoatmeal.com/comics/misspelling (http://theoatmeal.com/comics/misspelling)

http://theoatmeal.com/comics/apostrophe (http://theoatmeal.com/comics/apostrophe)

http://theoatmeal.com/comics/semicolon (http://theoatmeal.com/comics/semicolon)

http://theoatmeal.com/comics/literally (http://theoatmeal.com/comics/literally)

http://theoatmeal.com/comics/ie (http://theoatmeal.com/comics/ie)

http://theoatmeal.com/comics/irony (http://theoatmeal.com/comics/irony)


;D


Title: Re: Grammar Police Update
Post by: AKA_MrBill on August 30, 2011, 09:04 AM
So, let's be honest, when did you ever hear the term IMHO, and realize that it was truely humble???....

In My Honest Opinion, I will tell you exactly what I think, like it or not, it's what I think.  :-X