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Kites! Kites! Kites! => Sport Kites => Topic started by: rudyy on July 26, 2012, 08:34 AM



Title: Inland vs Coastal wind
Post by: rudyy on July 26, 2012, 08:34 AM
Just want to rant.

I am living in Buffalo area, and the wind here is crap.  I hardly get a nice breeze for me to fly (no wonder flying duals and revs here are not so popular).  It is either blowing like over 20mph or nothing at all.  Yes, there is occasional 8-14mph wind but most of the time it is bumpy on and off.

I still remember when I lived in Vancouver, BC, the wind is always nice and smooth.  I really miss that.  That is the kind of wind I need.  :'(


Title: Re: Inland vs Coastal wind
Post by: red sweater on July 26, 2012, 02:46 PM
On vacation to Utah. Figured the great outdoors in the west would have some good wind. I saw the tree limbs dancing in the breeze this morning, guessing 5-10 mph, but I had to wait until the kid had finished his morning nap, because the wife insisted on coming with me to watch me fly. Once he was up, guess what? 0-2 mph winds. No SUL in the bag, and even so, wouldn't be worth the effort in this heat. :P


Title: Re: Inland vs Coastal wind
Post by: Wayner on July 26, 2012, 05:01 PM
Just want to rant.

I am living in Buffalo area, and the wind here is crap.  I hardly get a nice breeze for me to fly (no wonder flying duals and revs here are not so popular).  It is either blowing like over 20mph or nothing at all.  Yes, there is occasional 8-14mph wind but most of the time it is bumpy on and off.


You are always welcome in Las Vegas. You will have not problem ajusting to our crappy wind  :P


Title: Re: Inland vs Coastal wind
Post by: Ken Bour on July 26, 2012, 07:28 PM
On vacation to Utah. Figured the great outdoors in the west would have some good wind. I saw the tree limbs dancing in the breeze this morning, guessing 5-10 mph, but I had to wait until the kid had finished his morning nap, because the wife insisted on coming with me to watch me fly. Once he was up, guess what? 0-2 mph winds. No SUL in the bag, and even so, wouldn't be worth the effort in this heat. :P

I think it's super cool that your wife wanted to watch you fly your kites! Sorry it didn't work out the way you hoped...

This morning I checked the wind conditions here in your homeland (D.C. metro) and they were barely SUL and I'm being generous. Then, after 5 pm, the winds picked up and, although variable and blustery, they were averaging 8-10 MPH (windmeter range: 1-16 MPH!). I was finally able to fly my WidowMaker (;D) and managed to perform several axels on both sides! Actually, I was amazed to discover that, when the wind died down was a near perfect time to attempt those tricks and, surprisingly, they worked (mostly)! I even did a couple just a few feet above the the ground! No 1/2 axels or cascades yet, but I can feel it coming... ;)

I managed a few turtles and flares, but couldn't get out of them to save my life! Either the kite just floated to the ground or the lines wrapped around the leading edge and down she came. I also need a lot of work on ground control. I still haven't figured out the correct procedure to recover from a belly landing. I keep trying to cartwheel, but half the time, I end up with the nose facing me and having to walk shamefully to flip it over! :(

Interestingly, because the winds were gusting over 15 MPH, I started on my 175# line (100'), but quickly found it very difficult to keep the kite in the air. Damn, those lines are HEAVY! ???  I then switched to my 100# Skybond (100') and that made a hugely positive difference. I flew for 2.5 hours though it was definitely a challenge trying to adjust to the sudden and abrupt wind changes.

I bought a set of 175# because Devin mentioned that he routinely flew his standards on that line. Having tried it, it seems so hard to conceive! I couldn't believe how much weight they contributed although, with his skills, in consistent 10-15 MPH winds they probably enable him to trick in the power zone without having to move a lot.

Ken

P.S. I just heard thunder (10:30 pm EDT), which probably explains the unusual summer wind conditions this evening!


Title: Re: Inland vs Coastal wind
Post by: DWayne on July 26, 2012, 07:51 PM
I've never noticed a difference. Every time I go to the beach the wind is just as crappy as it is here in the valley.

Denny


Title: Re: Inland vs Coastal wind
Post by: Kantaxel on July 26, 2012, 09:01 PM
I've never noticed a difference. Every time I go to the beach the wind is just as crappy as it is here in the valley.

Denny

Was the beach in UtaH?   ;D


Title: Re: Inland vs Coastal wind
Post by: mikeb on July 26, 2012, 09:05 PM
I wouldn't know coastal winds, I don't venture outward. But the Lake Erie area winds aren't too bad for me, I don't know the difference. wind is wind kite is kite.


Title: Re: Inland vs Coastal wind
Post by: tpatter on July 26, 2012, 09:53 PM
Dudes,

When it's coming off the ocean, we're talking flying a 180 degree window where the wind 1 foot off the ground is the same speed as the wind 100' off the ground all over the window and in all spots in between.  Generally I've only found this to be true when the wind has some strength to it, say 5 mph and up, but the light stuff is also super smooth.

It just doesnt get any better than that!

if anything, my primary complaint is that it can get pretty strong. 


Title: Re: Inland vs Coastal wind
Post by: RobB on July 27, 2012, 05:00 AM
During the summer, I fly inland winds to avoid the people at the beach. I'd rather fly in crappy winds than have people walking around. The difference in flying is stunning. Wind is wind ? I would have to disagree with that... I would've quit flying by now if I were exiled to flying inland wind all year round.
Thank goodness everyone around here forgets about the beach Sept.-May !


Title: Re: Inland vs Coastal wind
Post by: Tmadz on July 27, 2012, 05:59 AM
Well, I have to say that these inland breezes really are an impediment. My learning has certainly been slowed down by inconsistent winds and not many people to learn from. I have picked up more SLK's and am going to try landboarding, but I'm committed to stunt kites. I hope to keep at it and enjoy the time I can get at the shores. It appeals to the green in me. I like being outdoors in all weather and it doesn't cost me any electricity.

Maybe I'll get to move to the northwest shores at some point, but for now I'll have to dodge tornados and ride summer thermals to keep the kites in the air.


Title: Re: Inland vs Coastal wind
Post by: DWayne on July 27, 2012, 06:27 AM
Dudes,

When it's coming off the ocean, we're talking flying a 180 degree window where the wind 1 foot off the ground is the same speed as the wind 100' off the ground all over the window and in all spots in between.

I've heard that story a hundred times. Every time I go to the beach its either bumpy gusty winds off a storm or fogged in and dead calm. In almost 5 years I've flown in smooth wind once, and it wasn't near a beach.

Denny


Title: Re: Re: Inland vs Coastal wind
Post by: DD on July 27, 2012, 06:34 AM
Beach wind has a wide window and is consistent all the way to the ground. The problem becomes when it is 15-20mph constant, then it becomes time for heavy lines, wind breaks.


Title: Re: Inland vs Coastal wind
Post by: Tmadz on July 27, 2012, 08:38 AM
I wanna know how Devin does it. He's inland too, for the most part.


Title: Re: Inland vs Coastal wind
Post by: tpatter on July 27, 2012, 09:43 AM
Inland can be ok and sometimes even very very good.  What I've found is that it usually has no consistency, so you have to figure out where the 'good' wind is.  Where I usually fly, that window is very small, but you become very good at staying in it.   On a good day, it will bumpily blow in a consistent direction at least.

But, it's like weight training - when you do find good wind, it all seems like childs play - everything becomes more predictable and easier to do.

I get what you are saying Denny - I have driven for hours only to be treated with bad winds (too much, too little, wrong direction, storms) and wished that I had just stayed home (well, almost).   But the best flying that I've ever had has always been off water - super clean.   


Title: Re: Re: Inland vs Coastal wind
Post by: tpatter on July 27, 2012, 09:46 AM
Beach wind has a wide window and is consistent all the way to the ground. The problem becomes when it is 15-20mph constant, then it becomes time for heavy lines, wind breaks.

A smooth 15 is one of my favorites.  With a good standard or vent you can cut diamonds doing precision with that sail pressure.   Also perfect for comete and insane. 


Title: Re: Inland vs Coastal wind
Post by: JimB on July 27, 2012, 09:12 PM
It's a question of fetch.

If you have a BIG inland flying area that allows the wind to smooth out, then Bob's your uncle.

If you fly in a 1/4 mile bowl you're screwed.

The same is true at the beach. While the wind is generally better overall, crappy topography is crappy topography.


Title: Re: Inland vs Coastal wind
Post by: trigger on July 28, 2012, 07:13 PM
I have been blessed with finding a great field just 4 blocks from my house.  A high school, an elementry school, a bus lot and an airport  all together with the buildings around the perimeter and the fields in the center.  It has made flying 10x more enjoyable.  I will hopefully get back to the beach soon(hint:tmadz:-)  )   
  I will say poor winds have helped my skills some.


Title: Re: Inland vs Coastal wind
Post by: jim-bo on August 01, 2012, 05:21 AM
I also think that inland winds have made me a better pilot.  I just returned from a trip to the west coast of OR. USA and the flying was much easier. Fades just happened when you thought about them.
But I live 900 miles inland and that is the wind I have if I want to fly kites.   However,choosing your flying field has much to do with your quality of wind.   The local park with trees all around--not so good.  But if you only have 15 minutes that is what you have to use.  I prefer a 40 acre lawn that is adjacent to a college campus;  it is much more to my liking.


Title: Re: Inland vs Coastal wind
Post by: kepople on August 01, 2012, 06:48 AM
I am sure there are differecnes at the beaches also based on location.
I live in texas and winds hee are challenging. Either1-2 up high, or 15-30

After having spent a week at the beach, (gulf of mexico, hot and humid) I had days where I could not keep anything in the air, but mostly af ter breakfast, it was rev or nothing due to high winds.

Window was consistent top to bottom similar speed, but other Than that, they still went up and down, and ahead some turbulence.

Guess its down to beach location and skill level. I stink...

Kirb


Title: Re: Inland vs Coastal wind
Post by: asburyparkjohn on August 01, 2012, 07:42 AM
As with any other sport how good you become depends on practice and your tools. Wind is one of these tools. It just take longer to trick good in inland winds. For me its the kite, the lines I used and their length and the wind pattern on the beach that day which I always check on-line. I fly at North Beach in Asbury Park, NJ. Each year its getting more crowded as this beach city is making its come back. The beach I go to is called North Beach or Dog Beach. Five years ago there was maybe 20 dogs on the beach now there is over a hundred ... but good news ... after 8:30AM the head lifeguard ensures all dogs are off the beach (local rule - no dogs on the beach after 8:30AM) ... so I usually own the beach to 11:00AM. Usually people start encroaching on the beach at me at this time. Best conditions are low tide and a N, S or E wind. West winds which are prevalent (75%) are also good since there are no structures on the beach at this location. After Labor Day I move down near my beach house on First Ave. as dogs are then allowed on the beach all day at Dog Beach (8th Ave.) after Labor Day. The point of this detail message is I take what the beach gives me each day ... its a tough sport ... to break down and learn the tricks and to secure a beach spot without outside human and animal (dog) interferences during the low wind summer months. Inland or coastal does not matter if you can find the perfect wind, open space and no outside interferences.

APJ


Title: Re: Inland vs Coastal wind
Post by: Wayner on August 01, 2012, 10:58 PM

 I also think that inland winds have made me a better pilot.
 

+1

In our local low winds 90 wind shift are standard. 180 common. Last Thursday was a first. The wind shifted 360 so I was able to fly facing North, East, South and West. While a pain, was was able to keep flying.  ;)

Yesterday was the worst day every for flying.  :-[
I was practicing backspins. With rapid and constant changes in speed and direction I was only able to get into a couple of fades. So I practice my backspins using a fade launch.  ;D

I'm thinking if I can handle this I can handle just about anything.




Title: Re: Inland vs Coastal wind
Post by: lylenc on August 02, 2012, 09:22 AM
"The wind shifted 360 so I was able to fly facing North, East, South and West."

I had one of those mornings at the Manzanita, OR beach in July. Early morning 0-2 mph flying a SUL with wind from north, south, then east for about ten minutes each direction. After about ten minutes from the east, I thought it must be time for wind from the west ... mission accomplished. Fortunately, there weren't any long lull periods between puffs and not much down time at all. Still able to find zen.

The downside for that beach is that when it does decide to come from the west, it isn't long until it is 20+ mph. This year had only four days in the 20s and 30s from 10am on. Last year it was there every day. Lots of time on a vented Rev2.