GWTW Forum

Kites! Kites! Kites! => Beginners Corner => Topic started by: wmoy on May 25, 2009, 12:54 PM



Title: What's a leader line ?
Post by: wmoy on May 25, 2009, 12:54 PM
I've just read the leader line thread in the the Sport Kite Section, but not fully comprehend what was said.

Why would one have a leader line, other than what was written in the other thread?

What's the pros/cons of having a leader line?

When would one consider using a leader line ?

What are the rule of thumb in selecting a leader line (line weight, length ... etc) for a particular kite, and how do you make one, and how long is it typically ?

How do you attach a leader line to the kite's bridle ?

I tried google searching kite leader line, but didn't find much in answers.

Thanks.




Title: Re: What's a leader line ?
Post by: EnergonCube on May 25, 2009, 02:36 PM
I'm fairly new to kiting, so someone please correct/elaborate if I'm wrong here. But leader line -- as I understand it -- is an additional length of bridle line attached at the tow-points. The length of the leader can vary, but is typically as long as the leading edge of the kite.

I don't know all of the pros or cons, but I do know that leader line helps to prevent the spectra line from snagging on the LE. This is especially helpful with wrap ups and the like. Also, spectra line can be harsh and act as knife on the LE, so leader line eliminates that.

I've read that if you have two different colors of leader line, it helps to distinguish left from right in flight and, in general, makes it easier to see where the tow-points are.

As for the rest of your questions... dunno. I'm interested in those answers as well.  ;)


Title: Re: What's a leader line ?
Post by: RonG on May 25, 2009, 03:47 PM
Your answer is basically correct.  The primary purpose of the leaders is to spare the trailing edge and vinyl connectors of the kite from laceration by the flying lines, and to save wear and tear on the flying lines from contact with the kite.

Length of the leading edge is probably as good a rule of thumb as any.  Larkshead at the bridle towpoints like you would your flying line, and have figure eight or double overhand stopper knots at the end of the leaders to act as the new towpoints for the flying line.  As for different colors for distinguishing the lines in flight, being able to tell the right from left line at the kite end of things isn't particularly practical or useful when the kite is moving.


Title: Re: What's a leader line ?
Post by: DWayne on May 25, 2009, 04:20 PM
Bright colored leaders that contrast with the kite help when you're on the ground trying to get unwrapped.  :-[
Leaders also help the flying lines fall away from the kite faster when doing slack line tricks.


Denny


Title: Re: What's a leader line ?
Post by: RonG on May 25, 2009, 06:06 PM
Bright colored leaders that contrast with the kite help when you're on the ground trying to get unwrapped.  :-[
?
You're telling me that you can get useful visual information on a wrap 125' away, regardless of what the color of the leader is?  Ok.

I've always just used basic sense and feel to tell me what needs to be done.  It's worked pretty well for me thus far.


Title: Re: What's a leader line ?
Post by: DWayne on May 25, 2009, 06:32 PM
You're telling me that you can get useful visual information on a wrap 125' away, regardless of what the color of the leader is?  Ok.

Yes. I can see the leaders and which way they're wrapped around the kite. It helps me get unwrapped. Probably wouldn't help Ray Charles though.  :D


Denny


Title: Re: What's a leader line ?
Post by: Kantaxel on May 26, 2009, 04:01 AM
You're telling me that you can get useful visual information on a wrap 125' away, regardless of what the color of the leader is?  Ok.

Yes. I can see the leaders and which way they're wrapped around the kite. It helps me get unwrapped. Probably wouldn't help Ray Charles though.  :D


Denny

There isn't much of anything that would help Ray, now ;)

I'm color blind so a leader of a bright color can help in seeing (at least for me) which way the tip is wrapped.  (if I'm wearin' my glasses)


Title: Re: What's a leader line ?
Post by: wmoy on May 26, 2009, 04:50 AM
Your answer is basically correct.  The primary purpose of the leaders is to spare the trailing edge and vinyl connectors of the kite from laceration by the flying lines, and to save wear and tear on the flying lines from contact with the kite.

Length of the leading edge is probably as good a rule of thumb as any.  Larkshead at the bridle towpoints like you would your flying line, and have figure eight or double overhand stopper knots at the end of the leaders to act as the new towpoints for the flying line.  As for different colors for distinguishing the lines in flight, being able to tell the right from left line at the kite end of things isn't particularly practical or useful when the kite is moving.


Would it be a good rule of thumb to construct the leader lines the same weight class as the kite's bridle line ?

When would you use a heaver bridle line in constructing the leader and why ?



Title: Re: What's a leader line ?
Post by: King-J on May 26, 2009, 05:08 AM
I, learned this from flying with Denny, I first saw him with leaders on his WM's, all though I have not yet put them on my WM's but I need to, I use 50lb fly lines most of the time and it is so thin that it is starting to cut into some of my connectors, Not sure about the rest, but because I fly in lighter winds I would use mostly 100lb bridle line, even when I use 90lb fly line I think 100lb would be fine.


Title: Re: What's a leader line ?
Post by: RonG on May 26, 2009, 05:39 AM
Would it be a good rule of thumb to construct the leader lines the same weight class as the kite's bridle line ?

When would you use a heaver bridle line in constructing the leader and why ?
This is as good a rule of thumb as any.  I use 170# leaders on my standard and industrial, which I bridle with 170# line.  I don't put leaders on the light, because in that case the benefits don't outweigh cost of extra drag and loss of "contact" with the kite.