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Author Topic: How to get a full size print of the Le Quarts plan  (Read 553 times)
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macdawg
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« on: July 26, 2014, 09:57 PM »

I printed out all the Letter-size pages of the plan, and taped and cut them all out. It was tedious and didn't turn out very well. So I'l like to get the full size blueprint printed out at Staples or Kinkos. My question is how to get that first page to be full size? When I open it it PDF reader, it still shows the full size as 8.5x11. How do I know what the full size is, or get the page to print at the full size when I'm at the printer?

I'm just trying to avoid making the trip to get it printed and have them not be able to figure it out.

In case it helps the PDF is linked to on this page: http://www.tweelijners.com/tom/tomskitesite-en/Plan.html

Thanks!
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photogbill
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« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2014, 10:22 PM »

You need to go to the original web site where the plans were offered by the designer here:

http://users.skynet.be/cerfvolanttrick/jeu%20de%20cadre.htm

Then click on 'Prototypes' which will bring you to the different kites available for plans. Then click on the word 'français' underneath the 'Le Quartz' image.

Then ...Scroll down to '5. Voile / Plan :'  and under 'Panneautage 1' ...download that 'pdf.' file. That is the full size right hand side of the sail that you can take to Staples and have them print it out on their 'blueprint' size printer. If you want to make life easier for yourself during your build ...Either use Photoshop or another graphics program to 'horizontally flip' the image and save it for the left side template first. Staples may be able to do that for you but I always do that myself and have both sides printed. After you've made some templates and cut your panels out, you can use those left and right pdf. patterns to assemble your panels for both sides of your kite without having to do the left side in reverse.
Hope that all made sense!
« Last Edit: July 26, 2014, 10:25 PM by photogbill » Logged
macdawg
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« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2014, 10:42 PM »

Thank you so much, photogbill!
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macdawg
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« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2014, 10:49 PM »

This brings up another question Smiley How about getting templates for the moulds? I could still use the 8.5x11 sheets taped, but again, the results weren't great. It seems I'd have to get a lot of these full size print out to also be able to cut out each of the moulds, since they overlap. Suggestion on that?

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photogbill
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« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2014, 08:06 AM »

This brings up another question Smiley How about getting templates for the moulds? I could still use the 8.5x11 sheets taped, but again, the results weren't great. It seems I'd have to get a lot of these full size print out to also be able to cut out each of the moulds, since they overlap. Suggestion on that?


What I do is a tedious process but it will leave you with fairly durable templates which can be used for several kites.

First you might want to make your own kite table. I purchased a couple of 35" x 23.5" cutting boards from 'Hobbico' years ago. I taped them together on my work table giving me a 35" x 57" cutting surface. These were much more reasonably priced than those you will find at your local craft shop. I use the cutting board and a utility knife to cut out my templates (from construction board) and to cut my rip-stop panels. I do not use a hot knife like some and have not had any issues of material fraying, as long as I change the snap off utility knife blades often enough. I also use sticky seam tape along the entire seam edges of my kites so that also helps on a long term basis to keep your material edges from fraying. Others like to use a glue stick but I have not tried that method. The PC31 we use for kite making is coated material so it does not easily fray on a cleanly cut edge. The Hobbico cutting boards are a great investment that will last you years and years.

After printing out the full size sail pattern. I use FedEx Office Print and Ship Centers to print out a full 'right' side of the sail pattern. This saves a lot of time and frustration over trying to assemble dozens of 8 1/2 X 11 sheets of paper. which are nearly impossible to do without deviating from the intended end product. 

...I then start the process by making my panel templates. First, after trimming the pattern down, I tape the edges of the pattern down on my work table, laying my construction board underneath, between the cutting surface and and the pattern, taping it on the edges/corners to keep it from moving while I trace the individual fabric panels using Carbon Paper and a rolling (non-cutting) wheel (the blue handles tool in the photo below). I use a long aluminum ruler to help for straight edged panels. After the trace is complete, I then use a utility knife to cut the templates out, again using a ruler for a straight edge on the edges that are not curved. I careful cut the curved edges by following the lines created by the carbon paper tracing process. You can see that I also number my panels to help keep track of which panels go where.

I then use those templates and a ruler to cut all my panels out for the entire kite. I use strips of blue painters tape to keep the fabric from moving and additional strips of tape to keep my templates from moving on the fabric. I do this all along the edges of the templates, using more on the curved edges of the template since I will need to cut those out free-hand and I don't want my utility knife blade to slip underneath the template. This is a tedious process but it is one that has worked well for me. I also use a long ruler over the straight edges of my templates to help as I cut the panels out.

After all panels for both sides of the kite are cut out, I start to assemble the panels on top of the sail pattern, taping the lighter colors down first. You will want to have your darker colored panels overlap the lighter panels for the best results.I use seam tape along the entire joining edge and carefully align the overlapping sail panels using the sail pattern as my guide for aligning the panels, since most colors (other than the very dark colors) will allow some transparency to help in this process. I do this process for both sides of the kite. I like to have a flipped (left side) pattern printed out when kite building. It will cost a little more but will make the build process much easier. Costs me about $9 per side, left and right sail pattern.

After both left and right are finished I join the 2 side together in the center, again using the sail tapped to the sail pattern ...and using seam tape down the center of the joining sides. Once that is done, I like to use a one inch strip of mylar down the back of the kite center for added stretch protection. Some builders, including professionals, do this and some don't feel it's necessary. I also, use a triangular piece of mylar for reinforcement at the keel of the kite. During the sail panel assembly, I partially seam tape the mylar TE reinforcement 'panels' and finish securing those reinforcements with seam tape from the back side of the sail.

I now begin to sew all seams. I sew down the center of the kite where the two sides are joined first. Then I sew along the edge, both sides, of the one inch mylar reinforcement that was attached to the center of the back of the kite. Next, decide which way you plan on sewing your kite panels most efficiently, without having to start and stop your seams any more than necessary. This will vary from kite to kite, depending on how many panels there are and how those panels converge together.


More later if you need any help once you have reached this point! I need to fix myself something to eat and begin cutting my Monster kite rods for final assembly!  Grin
« Last Edit: July 27, 2014, 08:15 AM by photogbill » Logged
Mahtman
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« Reply #5 on: July 27, 2014, 04:00 PM »

What brand/size seam tape do you prefer? Does it gum up your needle?
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photogbill
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« Reply #6 on: July 27, 2014, 05:35 PM »

What brand/size seam tape do you prefer? Does it gum up your needle?

I use 1/4" which is just slightly smaller than an over-lapping seam. Not sure of the brand, I've bought it from several different suppliers over the years. And yes it does gum up the needle which I've managed to control by making a home-made thread oiler with a strip of velcro at the bottom of my sewing machine thread path and some 'All Purpose Sewer's Aid' from JoAnn's fabrics ( which I believe is a silicone solution). I use it fairly often on the velcro and on the needle itself. Try not to use too much because it will make some spotting on your ripstop if it gets on the material. Usually rubbing alcohol on a cloth takes it off. The home-made oiler has done wonders for the quality of my sewing results.
« Last Edit: July 27, 2014, 05:37 PM by photogbill » Logged
KaoS
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« Reply #7 on: July 27, 2014, 05:45 PM »

This brings up another question Smiley How about getting templates for the moulds? I could still use the 8.5x11 sheets taped, but again, the results weren't great. It seems I'd have to get a lot of these full size print out to also be able to cut out each of the moulds, since they overlap. Suggestion on that?



Do you have a glass patio door large enough to tape your large pattern onto?

If so, tape the pattern onto the inside of your glass door.  Use masking tape, it shouldn't leave any glue on the window.  Assuming you do this during the day  Wink  the pattern is now back lit and you can trace parts of it.

Put blank paper over the top of the original pattern, and trace each section you want as an individual panel.  Use straight edges/rulers whenever there are straight lines.  For curves, you can trace freehand if you have a steady hand.  Or you can trace against a french curve, even a bent coat hanger will do.

I've used butcher's paper in the past.  It is about three feet wide and on a continuous roll - I asked our local butcher if I could buy some from him, he gave me a 10 foot length.  If you use butcher's paper that is longer than the original pattern it is easy to tape it to the glass and not onto the original.  A bit of shifting between each panel trace is all that's required.
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Kevin Sanders

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« Reply #8 on: July 27, 2014, 06:04 PM »

Mahtman:
if i heard correctly, google this: Scotch CAT 085 Advanced Tape Glider with 2 Rolls of 1/4-Inch by 36-Yard Acid Free Tape....it is recommended by Ken McNeil (previously of Blue Moon kites)...good price.....
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macdawg
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« Reply #9 on: July 27, 2014, 08:16 PM »

Photogbill,
Thanks so much for taking the time to explain that. I'm going your route for the moulds -- thanks again!
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KaoS
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« Reply #10 on: July 28, 2014, 12:52 AM »

I notice Christian included the "moulds" in the download.  Only takes 14 pages on a laser printer, and the pages do have crop marks for easy alignment

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Kevin Sanders

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photogbill
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« Reply #11 on: July 28, 2014, 02:47 AM »

Photogbill,
Thanks so much for taking the time to explain that. I'm going your route for the moulds -- thanks again!

My pleasure! Good luck and keep us posted on your progress. Don't hesitate to ask if you have any new questions arise.
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macdawg
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« Reply #12 on: September 06, 2014, 01:55 PM »

Photogbill,
With two tiny kids, things take me a long time, and I'm finally getting back to this Smiley

I'm already stuck cutting out the templates -- I'm using this plan: http://users.skynet.be/cerfvolanttrick/quartz/Quartz_V_1_0.pdf

and not entirely sure which lines I should be tracing? I started going along the dotted lines, and the solid lines on the perimeter, but then got really confused at the bottom left, which has multiple dotted lines, at which point I realized I likely wasn't doing it correctly.

I know the panels need to overlap, but not sure if that comes from the template or if I add that when I cut around the template.

Can someone give me a boost please?

Thanks!
-Mac
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photogbill
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« Reply #13 on: September 06, 2014, 03:32 PM »

Photogbill,
With two tiny kids, things take me a long time, and I'm finally getting back to this Smiley

I'm already stuck cutting out the templates -- I'm using this plan: http://users.skynet.be/cerfvolanttrick/quartz/Quartz_V_1_0.pdf

and not entirely sure which lines I should be tracing? I started going along the dotted lines, and the solid lines on the perimeter, but then got really confused at the bottom left, which has multiple dotted lines, at which point I realized I likely wasn't doing it correctly.

I know the panels need to overlap, but not sure if that comes from the template or if I add that when I cut around the template.

Can someone give me a boost please?

Thanks!
-Mac


You need to basically ignore the 'dotted lines' on the full scale patterns when you are making your templates!When making each individual 'panel' template, you need to use the outermost 'solid' lines for each panel That way when the panels are assembled, you will have your 1/4+ inch overlap for ALL adjacent & connecting panels
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