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Author Topic: procedure to fly figure eights ?  (Read 1648 times)
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kiter
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« on: July 21, 2009, 11:21 PM »

hi,
just wanted to know your procedure on how to fly a basic figure eight in flight ?

what type of kites will do it,prob most,dumb question,lol ?

what length of line to use /needed ?

push or pull type turns ?

any other useful tips or hints ?

what wind range ?

never tried it but want to try.
thank you.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2009, 11:23 PM by kiter » Logged
Allen Carter
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« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2009, 11:33 PM »

In competition terminology it's an Infinity, 'cause it's an 8 on it's side and you fly the curves toward the ground so the "official" figure is "Infinity Downwards"

All the older STACK figures are animated here (including the Infininty):

http://reeddesign.co.uk/kites/index.html

The current official IRBC figures are here:

http://reeddesign.co.uk/iskcb/index.html

But the Infinity isn't in play. There's a split figure 8 though. It's a fun one.


Otherwise, you can fly 8s and stuff any old way you want.

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Allen, AKA kitehead
Allen Carter
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« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2009, 11:38 PM »

Generally, longer lines are better for doing competition figures. You have more sky to work with so things happen more slowly (the figure is bigger)

Big curves like these are usually pull turns. Pull turns generally keep pressure in the sail which makes it easier to control the speed of the kite. Push turns sort of stall one wing, so the kite can move quickly, but it's generally used for short radius turns.

Whatever wind is comfortable for your kite. If the wind is low it's hard to have a big enough windows to complete the figure. If the wind is too strong, you'll be moving faster.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2009, 11:44 PM by Allen Carter » Logged

Allen, AKA kitehead
kiter
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« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2009, 11:49 PM »

thanks allan.
much appreciated,btw,cool website for the tricks. Smiley
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mikenchico
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« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2009, 12:02 AM »

Probably the most important point in flying figures, 8's or others, is speed control. Your figures will look better to others and will be easier to do for you. Most kites will need you to move a bit to maintain a constant speed, usually moving forward during downward legs and back wards during rising legs. Turning radius's of many kites will change at different speeds so good speed control will lessen the need for small corrections which square up an otherwise flowing turn.

Follow the kite with your hands and body. Many of todays kites require such small inputs that just a small change in angle from the plane of your hands can dramatically change the radius of a turn.

A little trailing edge buzz will moderate speed changes, as the kite attempts to speed up the increase buzz will cause a corresponding increase in drag. Some fliers find it helpful to loosen the leech line for this reason.

Use all the window you can, large figures with close ground passes are the most dramatic IMO

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RonG
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« Reply #5 on: July 22, 2009, 05:19 AM »

Generally, longer lines are better for doing competition figures. You have more sky to work with so things happen more slowly (the figure is bigger)
I can't stress this point enough.  People trying to fly any kind of precision (especially in competition) on lines of 100' or less are doing themselves and the judges a real disservice.
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chilese
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« Reply #6 on: July 22, 2009, 05:29 AM »

It's also a good figure to work on in low wind.

You fly up when the kite is in the power zone, and use gravity to help with the turn when the kite is nearer the edge of the wind window.
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John Chilese: Las Vegas, NV
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lylenc
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« Reply #7 on: July 22, 2009, 07:07 AM »

Assuming the question was from a non-competition fun flying perspective:

The downward infinity works best if the wind is at the low end of the kite's wind range. You are gaining altitude in the center of the window where the wind is the strongest. The degree of hand movement can vary depending on the kite - at extremes from small hand movements in high winds and tight turning kites to fully extended arm movements in low winds and wide turning kites.

One time at Lincoln City I was just barely keeping a 10' Flexifoil in the air. The downward infinity was the most efficient (least work for pilot) way to keep it going. The turns were so wide and sweeping that I had to have the arms fully extended in opposite directions (combination push and pull turn) in order to avoid hitting the ground at the low portions of the infinity and be at the top of the window on the high portions.

Eventually I got into a rythem with feet planted and body rocking back and forth as the arms swung back and forth. It felt cool and must have looked cool, as I eventually came out of Zen Mode and noticed a few people were staring - or else they were wondering how it was staying in the air.
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Craig     Walla Walla, WA     Just One More!
kiter
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« Reply #8 on: July 22, 2009, 12:38 PM »

ok,thank you for the replies and helpful info.
much appreciated.
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inewham
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« Reply #9 on: July 23, 2009, 12:28 AM »

If you're interested in flying figures, try getting a copy of 'Sport Kite Magic' by David Gomberg. Its out of print now but you can get it on Amazon. It covers all the 'old' figures but gives an analysis of how to fly each figure.

You'll find plenty of resources for learning tricks but little on flying good precision, I thought the book was quite helpful.
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lylenc
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« Reply #10 on: July 23, 2009, 06:02 PM »

I was at a hot air balloon festival following my wife around to all the trinket vendor booths. A spouse of one of the vendors had a 10' Flexifoil laid out behind their tent on about 30' lines. He'd fly it whenever some puffs of wind came along - sparking my interest in getting one. I'm guessing he had lighter leading edge than the standard one, at least more flexible outer rods to get the arch shape at each end. I never got mine to fly in as low of wind as he could do it.

Flexifoils turn like a supertanker, if the leading edge is straight. I usually don't fly it at the low end of the wind range now. In those days I didn't have much, if any, option for low wind flying. I might have had a Jordan Air Millenium or a Pro Wren, but I've lost track of the order of purchases. I had heard of the stick extension turning solution, but never imagined them to be 60" long (or forgot with age) !   Shocked


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Craig     Walla Walla, WA     Just One More!
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« Reply #11 on: July 23, 2009, 11:30 PM »

For many beginners, the "Downward infinity" is the best pattern to fly in low winds, for reasons already outlined above. Kind of relaxing, too, I find! With a WindDance foil, it's also great fun in a breeze!
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Norm in Toronto
kiter
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« Reply #12 on: July 24, 2009, 05:11 AM »

ok then,thanks. Smiley
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