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Author Topic: Vietnam flute kite  (Read 3004 times)
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Roger
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« Reply #30 on: August 09, 2018, 03:41 PM »

It was a bit of a puzzle to do this without Lam's help and somehow I'd lost a few parts for mounting so I had to make some new ones.

Nice!
Quoting from Wahl & Chapman:
Quote
At first sight the Vietnamese kite flutes appear generically similar, however it quickly becomes clear that there are a great many varieties and it is probable that each village has its own variant. Each flute maker will have his distinct “signature”.
There are differences in the relationship between the flute length to flute diameter, the shape of the flute cap, the form of the sound-hole, and the relationship between the sound-hole length to its depth as well as  the  shape  of  the central omponents that  separate the  individual  flute  chambers and  provide  the attachment  fitting  to  the  flute mounting  stick.  Indeed  the  flutes  of Mr Ngô Văn Bội simply used the natural bamboo node. All of these factors are taken into consideration by individual flute makers in order to adapt their flutes to the expected wind speed as well as the desired sound quality when in flight.
Flutes are almost always made as a single unit comprising a pair of individual flutes tuned such that there is a distinctive beat."

So the mount needs tuning as well as the flutes. The wind will tell. On the red, note I am making only a single flute so there will be no beat as in traditional form.

On my project I was nearing the point where I have to cut the slot all the way through the cap. I decided to drill some through-holes a bit off the final edges so i can see where to cut from the outside and minimize any splitting. The holes also lessen the whitlin', which has me with a couple blisters now. Cheesy

Anyway, I got to looking at the holes and took the idea that leaving them might add 'overtones' if that is the correct acoustic term. I suspect each hole should be relieved inside on the leeward side just as with a single large opening. The number, size, and location of the holes would all be variables for experiment.

Well, I better stick with the traditional for now. As to mounting I figure to glue a stick along the tube rather than perpendicular as a number of my kites have horizontal struts. I will just replace the appropriate strut with the strut glued to the tube. I just built a Flymaxion for my son and I'll grab a pick of what I intend.



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Roger
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« Reply #31 on: August 09, 2018, 04:19 PM »

Here's how I propose to mount my flute on a Flymaxion.


This video below is my original Flymaxion on its maiden flight at Long Beach a couple weeks before last year's festival. The rocking I corrected with an adjustable third bridle leg running to the lower-front vertex.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hPQdfvpBFNs
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Roger
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« Reply #32 on: August 10, 2018, 06:25 PM »

Today I got the cap to what looked like a good testing stage and yada yada yada, bleh bleh bleh, Bob's yer uncle, F4 341.8Hz flute.


Audio-video: > https://youtu.be/p7mjAYdl_9U

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Oldgoat
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« Reply #33 on: August 11, 2018, 09:07 AM »

Wow Roger, it appears that you are well on your way to having a successful flute.  So what did you use as a wind source for the test?  I'm still deliberating about what to use as basic materials.  Leaning toward PVC but trying to think of something as easy to work and as inexpensive that would be a little lighter.  The end cap is still an issue for me.  This is one of those times I wish I new more (read knew anything) about 3D printing.  I'm thinking someone with the right skill set could knock out terrific and consistent end caps in no time if they had the right blueprint.
 Smiley

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Roger
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« Reply #34 on: August 11, 2018, 09:30 AM »

Wow Roger, it appears that you are well on your way to having a successful flute.  So what did you use as a wind source for the test?  I'm still deliberating about what to use as basic materials.  Leaning toward PVC but trying to think of something as easy to work and as inexpensive that would be a little lighter.  The end cap is still an issue for me.  This is one of those times I wish I new more (read knew anything) about 3D printing.  I'm thinking someone with the right skill set could knock out terrific and consistent end caps in no time if they had the right blueprint.
 Smiley

I used an air conditioner vent for my wind, which I clocked at 17mph. I'm re-reading Wahl & Chapman to get all the bits I skimmed, such as what makes the difference between low-wind & high-wind flutes.

Following the musical tips from breezin & bt I found a page giving the frequency & wavelength of notes. A pure F4 has a frequency of 349.23Hz and a wavelength of 98.79cm. Divide 98.79cm by 4 to get length of 24.6975cm for a 1/4 wave tube as is done for tuning stopped organ pipes. These flutes are essentially stopped flue type organ pipes, differing only in the shape & placement of the sound hole.  My tube right now is 193.5cm inside length (20cm minus a 6.5mm end plug.) so I may make a 1/4 wave tube to experiment.

I think you're on to something with 3-d printing, though that's above my pay grade. Embarrassed As to end caps, they only have to be plugs if you build the 'weeping bamboo' type of flute I mentioned a few posts back. Keep us posted on your efforts!  Smiley
« Last Edit: August 11, 2018, 09:38 AM by Roger » Logged
Roger
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« Reply #35 on: August 12, 2018, 10:17 AM »

The 1/4 wave length tube did not pan out; no tone, no joy. I read something about taking 1 tube diameter off the 1/4 wave length but I couldn't find the reference again. Anyway, theoretics aside, I have a working flute so I will stay with what works.

I finished the cap and gave it a thorough dousing with natural Watco Danish oil. It has some minor cosmetic scrapes but as they don't affect the work the cap does, I'm pushing on. Now working to finish the tube with a mount and painting. I plan to glue the cap on with hot-melt glue so I have a chance to remove it without breaking should the need arise.  Cool



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Roger
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« Reply #36 on: August 12, 2018, 03:58 PM »

My tube is spiral-wound cardboard as found inside wrapping paper. Using yellow wood glue, I glued a 6.5mm thick balsa stop in the end of the tube. I then 'painted' the tube inside & out with the glue using a wetted brush.
Next I glued a 9x9mm rail along the tube, offset at the cap end so the cap can slip on. On the top of the rail I carved a coved channel to receive my 1/4" struts, and I embedded a protruding steel pin near each rail end to hold the strut in place when it is tied. Once positioned on a strut I will tie it on with 3 ribbons. I can adjust the angle of attack of the flute's mouth by rotating the strut in its connectors.
When all the glue is good and dried I will paint the exterior of the tube with Golden acrylic paint. I'll leave the interior with the glue finish as the acrylic paint with its rubbery texture might dampen the signal.
That's a wrap. Cool.
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Roger
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« Reply #37 on: Yesterday at 07:44 PM »

Finished dieu sao mounted on a Flymaxion. I did another read of the note with the spectrum analyzer when all was glued up and it was hitting around 346Hz to 350Hz; right on the sweet Fa of 349.23Hz.   Smiley


PS I got to thinking that another way to mass produce flute caps would be to make silicone molds of existing carved caps and then cast reproductions from the mold.
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