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Author Topic: are longer lines easier to trick with??  (Read 2479 times)
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SMG
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« on: September 06, 2009, 09:08 PM »

Had some fun with my new (to me) SF 2.5 UL today. Got it flying in a decent wind and loved it. I did have some issues though in that I am using 50' x 50# lines. It seemed that I could not throw enough slack to it to get the kite to flip fully over.

I did manage to get it to fade a couple of times, which was cool. Still cannot figure out how to stall though. Anyhow, I could get the kite to flip backwards but not continue to wrap up the lines and get the nose to come back up again.

Dunno, thought maybe longer lines might help. I have some on order and hopefully they will be here this week.

Cheers,
Sean
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fidelio
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« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2009, 09:27 PM »

longer lines give you a bigger wind window and allow you to experiment while maintaining greater distance from the ground.

my personal preference is 100 feet. i rarely fly longer or shorter, but if i were pressed i'd rather go longer than shorter.
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chilese
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« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2009, 01:20 AM »

As a general rule.....

10 times the wingspan is for learning tricks

You get to see how the kite is moving and how the lines interact with the kite

15 times the wingspan is for learning figures

You get a larger window and can practice holding a straight line

So all-around flying.....

12.5 times the wingspan

You can still see the lines and how the kite is moving, but
you're not hogging all the field.

On an 8 foot kite that's:

80 feet for learning tricks
100 feet for general flying and tricking
120 feet for learning figures

Just my opinion.  Smiley
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obijuankenobe
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« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2009, 02:57 AM »

Keep in mind that longer lines will produce slightly more bow in your lines, making your inputs less stacatto at the kite.  Thus, there is a limit depending on line strength, the thicker lines bowing more.  Many fliers say that longer lines make it harder to feel the kite come off and hit the lines again.  I know this only because I usually fly with longer lines (+35m), and folks that switch to my kite often comment negatively if they are used to shorter line sets. 

That said, the above is a rather small effect.  The greater window size and more effective flying space is the main appeal/advantage to longer lines IMHO. 

obi
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RobB
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« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2009, 04:31 AM »

Hey there...
I find that some kites like to be on longer lines like 100' (Exile) while other kites like to be on shorter lines 75'-85' (QPro). Some kites go either way, but I know that my Exile isn't happy and doesn't respond well to short lines. Your SF will probably be happy on longer lines than 50', that's for sure. Those 50s are only good for light wind or small spaces.
~Rob.
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ezme6
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« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2009, 05:15 AM »

longer lines mean you have to walk further to pick up your kite! I use 85' Cool
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tpatter
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« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2009, 09:47 AM »

I'd say that it depends on the winds.

The higher the winds, then longer the lines for me.  If you fly on 120' lines it is amazing how much it helps your flying in decent wind.  Shorter lines give you less time to react and a much smaller window, but in light wind I often prefer them. 

I don't like the lines to "bow" at all.  Any of that and I usually move to lighter and/or shorter lines.

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ko
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« Reply #7 on: September 07, 2009, 10:00 AM »

+1 but 85 is my go to length amazing how 85ft of 300 # will slow a kite down dont think its the weight more like lots of drag. on the other end it is hard to get 85ft of 50# to droop great response  ko
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have fun kurt
Dolphinboy
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« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2009, 12:21 PM »

I like tricking on shorter lines. In standard winds I use 65-85' 100 lb & I use 75' the most. UL & SUL I like 35-70' 50 or 80 lb and my most used set is 55'.
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« Reply #9 on: September 07, 2009, 02:44 PM »

Boy line length is a personal thing, here some like short lines for light wind, some like long lines to increase the window and maybe find wind up higher. Some like long lines for tricking to give more room to recover, some like short lines to see what's going on better.

I personally prefer lines at 75-85 feet for most flying, 50-60 feet in no wind conditions as it makes running 360's easier and around here in those conditions if you have ground winds blowing from behind you above 40 feet they will be blowing the opposite direction anyway as often as not. I also sort of like the short lines with smaller zippier kites like the Freestylist or Wolf.

I haven't felt comfortable with lines over 90 feet in years unless there's a FlexiFoil on the other end. Then you better clear the field because I will be sweeping ground level, border to border plucking cloverheads at 80 MPH  Tongue





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Allen Carter
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« Reply #10 on: September 07, 2009, 03:23 PM »

That's a pretty big kite for such short (and light) lines.

I flew my 2.5 on 75' some, but a kite that size is generally happier on longer. 100' would be my choice, but sometimes it depends on field space.

I wouldn't fly it on lighter than 90#. Between having to give strong inputs to get it to move, and the pull  generated if the wind picks up, I'd say a 2.5 would eat 50# line.

Generally speaking I think 50# is limiting for learning tricks as you cant operate with very many wraps.
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Allen, AKA kitehead
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« Reply #11 on: September 07, 2009, 04:48 PM »

Yeah, I have ordered 90#x75' lines already, I was just using what I had with my HQ Bebop for lines on the SF. It was interesting though, fliying it in decent wind, I could really tell that the lines were being tortured. I shut down the kite a couple of times when the winds got too high, which was good, but as my only other kite (at the moment) is the Bebop I was not so happy.

The bebop needs at least 10mph to go and I was just at the edge of that, whereas it felt really heavy on the SF in the same wind. The kite itself did not seem to mind that wind, and did great figures but would not flip over at all for me. Probably me though, not much experience at this yet.

Cheers,
Sean
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ezme6
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« Reply #12 on: September 07, 2009, 07:26 PM »

+1 but 85 is my go to length amazing how 85ft of 300 # will slow a kite down dont think its the weight more like lots of drag. on the other end it is hard to get 85ft of 50# to droop great response  ko

Yup, for me any length of #50 is a little tough to work with.....outside
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