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Author Topic: Long learning curve  (Read 232 times)
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Ashbridge
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« on: April 14, 2019, 09:08 AM »

You know those special days when the wind is perfect and you feel like you’ve made more progress in a couple of hours than you normally do in a month?

Yesterday wasn’t that kind of day.  It was the other kind.  I was flying a vented, but still.  Should have quit earlier.

The people walking by on the beach boardwalk as I was packing up my kites may have wondered why I was cursing under my breath.  My goal is to be happy smiling Jedi kite pilot on the beach, not frustrated cursing kite guy on the beach.  Yesterday the latter won out.

Maybe next weekend.  Long learning curve when you work full time, wow.  I hope I have enough time to actually get good at this sport before I retire in 20 years. 
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Bob D
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« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2019, 10:33 AM »

Talk about long learning curve. I've been flying since '97. Family obligations and life has gotten in the way a lot. I don't get out more than 6 - 10 times a year so it's been a long road. The point is to have fun doing it.
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Bob D.
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« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2019, 10:48 AM »

You know those special days when the wind is perfect and you feel like you’ve made more progress in a couple of hours than you normally do in a month?

Yesterday wasn’t that kind of day.  It was the other kind.  I was flying a vented, but still.  Should have quit earlier.

The people walking by on the beach boardwalk as I was packing up my kites may have wondered why I was cursing under my breath.  My goal is to be happy smiling Jedi kite pilot on the beach, not frustrated cursing kite guy on the beach.  Yesterday the latter won out.

Maybe next weekend.  Long learning curve when you work full time, wow.  I hope I have enough time to actually get good at this sport before I retire in 20 years. 


You need two additional hobbies:  fishing and beer. If you don't like the wind, grab the rod. Fish ain't biting, grab a beer. Bar ain't open, fly a kite or go fishing.
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MARK

"...it's a fair wind blowin' warm, out of the south over my shoulder, guess I'll set a course and go." CSN&Y
Ashbridge
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« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2019, 10:57 AM »

Talk about long learning curve. I've been flying since '97. Family obligations and life has gotten in the way a lot. I don't get out more than 6 - 10 times a year so it's been a long road. The point is to have fun doing it.

You’re right and I do have fun 90% of the time.  Once in a while impatience does bubble up though, especially when one watches too many video clips of advanced pilots.

I’ve accepted it as a long game, but there can be a certain discouragement to that as well.  I liken the feeling to someone joining a martial arts dojo, working hard at it for several years, becoming competent, but also realizing that no matter how much time and effort they put in, they’re never going to be Bruce Lee.

You learn about this kind of thing in media studies.  TV and video of any sport is generally dominated by the best of the best of the best, whereas before TV, people were exposed to local talent only.  In this way, TV has been great for audiences and bad for performers.

But anyway.  It's raining today so I'm procrastinating.   Cheesy
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RobertH
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« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2019, 04:57 AM »

I've been flying for only five years. I started watching videos on Youtube and thought it would be fun to fly dual-line kites. However, I found out quickly that the pilots in the videos make it look very easy. None the less, I persevered and keep learning and gaining experience even though it's frustrating at times. Couple that with the fact that wind is in short supply where I live and one finds that frustration is the norm while trying to fly.

I soothe these frustrations by doing other things such as woodworking or photography. I have come to the conclusion that I will probably never be the level of flyer I want to be. But, it is fun and I enjoy it. I may never get to the level of flying by most of these guys on this forum and that's OK. The main thing is... am I having fun and will it continue to be a challenge? I think so.
   
« Last Edit: April 15, 2019, 04:59 AM by RobertH » Logged

Allen Carter
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« Reply #5 on: April 15, 2019, 05:41 AM »

I’ve been flying Sport Kites for 21 years. My “Learning Curve” ended at about year 2. I decided to fly purely for enjoyment, not to try to bust my ass and compare what I was doing to anyone else.

It may seem strange considering I was actively involved in sport kite competion until like year 6, but I quickly realized that I had to enjoy what I was doing more than “get better”

I found that I could learn new stuff (including Pairs Ballet flying in year 5) and keep having fun only if really paid attention to not making it like “work”.

Any time I found myself frustrated or swearing or just not having fun I did something different.

One key is to pay attention to what feels good and do more of that. If you don’t “learn” anything in a week or a month or a year of flying, it was still good. For me it was putting on headphones and just flying to the music. Not trying to “do” stuff all the time.

Of course I learned and got better at stuff. I learned how to do lots of slack line tricks which I have now forgotten for the last decade or so. I’ve got my repertoire and it varies somewhat but within that range I can enjoy flying every time and not worry about improving or practice.
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Allen, AKA kitehead
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