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Author Topic: some sled/laundry questions  (Read 1736 times)
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streamhawk
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« on: September 21, 2009, 10:30 AM »

I've only gotten into the world of single lines in the last year, but find I'm enjoying it alot. I'm a dedicated dual line flier, I think of my slk's as "festival kites", something I can stake and fly to add to the show while I'm flying my duals. So far I only have delta's, an 11 and 7 foot Gomberg Ghost Delta, and a Premier Flo-tail, all of which I enjoy alot. I am finding apart of festivals however, if I stake the things out when I'm flying my dual lines, it generally draws a few onlookers, something my dual lines rarely seemed to do.

So, I've been looking for something else to put up in the air and decided on a sled and some laundry to fly. I am very aware of the dangers of power sleds, which has kept me away from it, but I'm putting my toes in the water, so to speak. I have ordered a Premier Power Sled 36, with some Willi Koch designs, the Myriapod, Hydroid, and Cephalopod to be exact, and also a Gomberg 18 foot custom spin sock. I can fly the 18 foot Gomberg or trade out with enough wind for the three Koch's for a different look.

I'm wanting to know if there is a general rule of thumb for how far down from the sled to attach the laundry, say 15 or 20 feet maybe? More? And also how far apart for different pieces, about the same? Also, any advice on staking down? I'm in an area with alot of rocks in the ground, so an auger type anchor wouldn't work so good here, I'm thinking an "X" pattern of steel construction stakes with strong webbing in between to tie them together might be the ticket for my ground. I have some climbing webbing with a 4,000 lb. test carabiner on the way too. Think I'll use 500# line for this setup.

I say trying the waters, later on I'm toying with the idea of getting the Mega Sled 81, way too much kite and pull for me to start with I think. Any info you guys may have or questions I forgot would be much appreciated.

Bill
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DD
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« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2009, 11:55 AM »

I would start here:
http://www.gombergkites.com/faq.html
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mikenchico
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« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2009, 12:25 PM »

The 81 is a handfull, I have hand held one in 8-10 mph - probably foolishly - so they are manageble. I think you'll be pleased with the 36, they will hoist pretty much laundry and as long as the wind is smooth they behave themselves well.

I don't know if there is a good rule of thumb regarding placement of laundry on the line, I just eyeball it. IMO you shouldn't get it too close to the kite so the kite has a bit of room to wander without any side to side wandering becoming to quick for the kite to correct for, the laundry will act a bit like a semi stationary anchor point, too close and the pendulum effect will speed up.

I'll be looking forward to more experienced opinions on the subject myself.

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streamhawk
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« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2009, 12:54 PM »

thanks DD, been all through that stuff, and great info in there. Mike, I do the same with my 11 foot Ghost, have a 75' streamer tail I will put on,wind allowed, and just eyeball it. Just wasn't sure, I'm a complete newbie with this sort of thing, just the opposite with dual lines. I do know I'm anxious for my stuff to start coming in...

Bill
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MtnFlyer
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« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2009, 02:13 PM »

Regarding the 18' spinsock, you probably don't want to fly that too high up the line. It'll definitely put a kink in the line at the attachment point - it pulls pretty good - and it looks cool down low.  Wink  IIRC, this was under a GKPI 40 sq.ft. sled.



That said, the normal mini-carabiner attachment method will work fine, and 500# line is good for the 36. You can drop down to 300# in lighter winds, depending on the laundry.
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Bob
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« Reply #5 on: September 21, 2009, 02:16 PM »

ah, good stuff Bob, thanks a bunch. I had thought the 18' windsock would look better down low, nice to see a pic! I customized mine a bit,  diamond pattern with spikes, left yellow and orange out of the typical rainbow, added light blue and yellow/green instead. Good to know about the line bend with it, appreciate the advice! So, is that the 18' in your photo? How high up do you tend to run it, like, 20' or so? I also added a rainbow spikey ball to my order. David has told me the 18' windsock only needs about a 30 square foot sled to lift it, I felt the Premier sled was good bang for the buck.

Bill
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MtnFlyer
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« Reply #6 on: September 21, 2009, 03:27 PM »

That's an 18 footer from DG with a 12 foot CTW below it. I like it just up out of reach to maximize the impact, also because folks walk along without paying attention or thinking about wind shifts.

I agree, the 36 is a good kite for the spinsock and a good all-around lifter, too. Anchor well. Wear real leather gloves. You'll do fine with it.

If you move up to the 81 later you'll also want to upgrade to 750#-1100# line and serious anchors. I've had that one up where it was pulling so hard I couldn't get another wrap around the 'biner.  Shocked Respect the wind.
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Bob
streamhawk
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« Reply #7 on: September 22, 2009, 06:55 AM »

hey Bob, don't mean to keep hitting you up, but please define "serious anchors".  I'm thinking of construction grade stakes in an "X" pattern with a strap tying the two together, carabiner on the end, much like Gomberg shows on his site. Or would I need a double set of these to half the load 50/50 for the 81? Anchoring down well is my main "fear" for sleds and one of the reasons I haven't ventured down this path so far.

Bill
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MtnFlyer
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« Reply #8 on: September 22, 2009, 09:31 AM »

It's good to be cautious and conservative. I probably over-anchor every time.

To address your question, it depends on the soil. You mentioned rocky but what about the firmness of the dirt?

I've used the X pattern with concrete stakes, with the crossing point close to the ground and the whole X leaning perpendicular to the line of pull. I usually use at least 24" stakes with only 6" above ground. Larger kite, higher wind, use longer stakes. My longest are 3' IIRC. Just slip one end loop over a stake and wrap around the X horizontally then vertically then out to the carabiner.


Test it. Grab the strap and lean back; see how it feels. It should be good. You can always put another anchor behind the first at any time like this GKPI illustration shows.


I've also looped webbing around the lower part of a front tire and clipped the 'biner into both end loops. Just remember to leave it in gear and set the brakes.

If you haven't already, read the FAQ on Anchoring Big Kites and Big Inflatable Kites (has a lot about the lifters and anchoring, too) that Dave Gomberg has.
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Bob
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« Reply #9 on: September 22, 2009, 10:05 AM »

yep, read all that Bob, a great source of info in there. Ok, guess that answers most of my questions, I had looked at 18" stakes, sounds like the 24" is the better way to go, that and about a 5 lb. sledge hammer, heh. I appreciate all the replies, very helpful. Thanx again.

Bill
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