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Author Topic: Line Length  (Read 2596 times)
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evolekim
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« on: May 09, 2010, 12:51 PM »

I was thinking about making a shorter line set to use while learning to trick,  I saw on the Prism Video that Mark recomends a 40 FT line set.  Is 40Ft what most would recomend ?  I have an old 85Ft set and was thinking of making 2 40 FT sets

Mike
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xuzme720
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« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2010, 12:54 PM »

I would make a 35' and a 50'...
use the 35' for the lighter wind days and the 50 footers for the more blustery days...
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Asfink tersez wot....

Exactly! Party on, Garth!
chilese
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« Reply #2 on: May 09, 2010, 12:56 PM »

Typically:

Line length is a function of kite wingspan.  Larger kite, longer line length.

Let's assume you have a 7 foot wingspan kite.

Trick line = 10 wingpans = 70 feet

All-around line = 12 wingspans = 84 feet

Figure flying  = 15 wingspans = 105 feet

These are guidelines.

40 feet is very short for a dual line set unless you're flying a smaller kite (4D for example)

Good luck.  Smiley
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John Chilese: Las Vegas, NV
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ko
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« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2010, 01:38 PM »

as john said 40 is ok for a very low wind kite and day  the 85ft lineset you have now will give you way more time to react. there are many here who fly 100ft and up for normal flying i guess what i am trying to say is DONT CUT THEM unless you intend to replace them i fly 85ft normally just my opinion KO
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have fun kurt
tcope
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« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2010, 01:40 PM »

Keep in mind that while tricking, the size of the wind window does not matter as much. You just don't need a huge wind window for what you are doing. The benefits of shorter line while tricking that you are able to see the kite better, your movements are relayed to the kite more quickly (less stretch in the line) and (I'm told) it's a shorter walk to the kite when you screw up and it crashes.

Personally, I almost always fly with 50-60' lines. I do this as I usually fly in smaller spaces, I can still practice most precision moves... I just need to be quick (I'd not practice for a tourny this way) and I buy bulk line in 125' lengths that is inexpensive and good line (cut in 1/2 for a dual set).

I don't know that I've ever considered the size of the kite when choosing line length. Of course, I've never flown a 15' kite and you'd probably not be doing a lot of tricks with a kite like this.
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Todd Copeland
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DWayne
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« Reply #5 on: May 09, 2010, 02:59 PM »

My shortest set is 75'. I prefer 125'.
FWIW I think the size of the window does matter for tricks. I don't think I could get many rotations from a rolling cascade on 35' lines.  Wink

Denny
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freecheese
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« Reply #6 on: May 09, 2010, 02:59 PM »

I actually find it easier to learn on longer lines. They're much more forgiving, and you have some slack built in due to the sag of the lines. I trick with 120' unless I really need space or the wind is very light. If you have vision problems, however, I think shorter lines are the way to go; it really helps to see what the bridle is doing.

Josh
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zippy8
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« Reply #7 on: May 09, 2010, 03:56 PM »

Flying lines for a dual line kite should reach all the way to the kite on the right and all the way back to the flyer on the left.

Everything else is conjecture and personal preference.

Mike.
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tcope
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« Reply #8 on: May 09, 2010, 04:12 PM »

Flying lines for a dual line kite should reach all the way to the kite on the right and all the way back to the flyer on the left.

Everything else is conjecture and personal preference.
Except you have it backwards.... the lines are supposed to go out on the left and come back on the right. It's pure nonsense to have it the other way around.
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Todd Copeland
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zippy8
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« Reply #9 on: May 09, 2010, 04:33 PM »

I'm in the eastern hemisphere, you're in the western. You have to account for the Coriolis Effect. Think it through  Roll Eyes

Mike.
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chilese
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« Reply #10 on: May 09, 2010, 04:36 PM »

You gentlemen do realize there are some lurker newbie's who are attempting to absorb all the "knowledge" you're spewing forth.  Roll Eyes
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John Chilese: Las Vegas, NV
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DD
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« Reply #11 on: May 09, 2010, 05:13 PM »

all are correct, some more enjoyable then others Cheesy

I only use 50' for extremely light winds, others wise i like 100'.
Kite size and field size, become a factor

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Sine Metu!
tpatter
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« Reply #12 on: May 09, 2010, 05:44 PM »

In Light winds, I do like flying short lines, but 8mph+, 100'-120' is super sweet.
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6 kite tom
DaveH
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« Reply #13 on: May 09, 2010, 06:27 PM »

yup. Using short lines in strong winds is too much like swatting flies.

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zippy8
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« Reply #14 on: May 09, 2010, 06:50 PM »

You gentlemen do realize there are some lurker newbie's who are attempting to absorb all the "knowledge" you're spewing forth.  Roll Eyes
I stand by my first statement. The second... maybe not so much  Tongue

Mike.
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Virtual Freestyle - ǝlʎʇsǝǝɹɟ lɐnʇɹıʌ
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