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Author Topic: Maintaining stalls in "gusty" winds  (Read 994 times)
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crunchie
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« on: May 31, 2010, 07:56 AM »

Quick question, are you able to maintain perfect stalls in changing wind conditions (meaning not lab grade winds)?  It seems that I cannot adjust my moving forward / backwards fast enough to react, and thus loosing the stall.

Just wondering if its normal of if it can be done.

Crunchie
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Bob D
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« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2010, 08:24 AM »

It's admirable that you're even asking the question. Up until this year, stalls were low on my list of things to learn. Maybe some of the better guys can do it but I'm happy just to be able to hold a stall for a discernible amount of time at all!

Like the "smooth" posting, it's all about experience and time on the lines.
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Bob D.
chilese
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« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2010, 10:59 AM »

Nobody maintains "perfect" stalls in changing wind conditions.

Stalls are all about reacting, which means there is a built in "lag time" as we respond, not anticipate.

Stalls and side slides are a low priority these days, but they are good tricks when done well.

My snap stall percentage to a good, still pose is about 10%, but I keep practicing them. Maybe in about another 10 years.....  Roll Eyes
« Last Edit: May 31, 2010, 12:14 PM by chilese » Logged

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Allen Carter
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« Reply #3 on: May 31, 2010, 11:07 AM »

A lot of really good freestyle kites are damn hard to hold a stall with. The general instability that makes them easy to toss around makes them more likely to wobble in a stall. Bigger kites, especially older designs, are much easier to hold in a stall.

Flip side, is that a smaller kite is easier to get into a stall in the first place. I nice big ballet kite wants to hold onto the air and need some energy to snap stall.
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Allen, AKA kitehead
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« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2010, 12:28 PM »

I think there is also something to be said for 'how big is your wind window' in inland winds.  In the 'center' of the window its alot tougher and can be kite dependant as mentioned above, but inland winds seems to have a 'narrower' wind window that lets you get to edge abit easier and stall/trick there. On the downside the 'edge' will sometimes move away and then it becomes a controlled fall.
Bumpy winds also make it tougher to set the bridle on a kite for amount of 'drive', i generally will set for more 'drive' and 'ride the edge' when the wind picks up.
Once you get it stalled keeping it can be tough, just move to another trick once you get it stalled.
Imho, ymmv
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Sine Metu!
crunchie
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« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2010, 02:14 PM »

Thanks for all the input! So I'm not lunatic, its actually hard to keep in less than perfect winds.

I'll keep practicing it, maybe I'll get better at it with time.

Crunchie
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tcope
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« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2010, 10:31 PM »

I think an important part of keeping a stall in crappy wind is the right kite. That is, it's much easier if the kite is under powered for the wind speed. for example, I mid vented kite in 5-6mph. It's going to fly in the upper part of that wind but on the slow side. So when a gust comes up, it's not going to power up very much in the stall.  Lighter kites or kites under more power are going to power up very quickly in gusts.
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Todd Copeland
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