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Author Topic: bridle adjustment noob stylie  (Read 1184 times)
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skykbass
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« on: August 16, 2010, 08:40 PM »

I have noticed while adjusting the bridle on my 4d to nose forward, or light-wind, that the turning radius becomes drastically bigger making a snap stall all but impossible. The opposite is also to the extreme making the kite micro-sensitive. The question is Why? and does this apply to all kites with turbo bridles? Thanks again! Smiley
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tpatter
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« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2010, 10:18 PM »

I've been flying mine with the nose a bit back from the stock setting (in the middle).  It flys with drive in next to nothing and also seemed to trick best to me this way.

The kite is so light I don't think the AoA is too critical - just get used to it flying slowly in no wind.

Give it a shot.
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DonCrash
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« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2010, 10:54 PM »

Not quite sure bout 'all' kites, but yes, your turning radius can be affected by the bridle adjustment. Some kites are more noticeable than others.

Moving the adjustment down also moves the tow point out a bit, thus a slight change in turning radius, or a huge change (depending on kite).
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Vented L'organic; Vortex; DS (closeted); Quantum (modded to taz); Ocius STD, UL, UL (2pt P90), SUL; Pi (Home made kite)
zippy8
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« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2010, 01:00 AM »

The question is Why?

You may find this illuminating. Skip ahead to page 18 (which is page 21 of the PDF due to the cover and foreword). It comes from a time where turning radius was more important than Axels ('cos the Axel had yet to be invented~discovered).

The other obvious point of call would be here, although it is more trick orientated.

HTH

Mike.
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Allen Carter
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« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2010, 07:50 AM »

does this apply to all kites with turbo bridles?

Not just turbo bridles. You've described normal behaviorfor most 2 line kites.

To expand a bit:

Nose forward (tow point moved UP) can give you increased lift, straighter tracking and reduced pull. These also result in increased speed, reduced responsiveness to turning input, increased turning radius and difficulty stalling.

Nose back (tow point moved DOWN) can give you easier stalls, more responsive turning, tighter spins. The flip side is more pull, less stability, less lift.

Most kites have a sweet spot which is the best compromise between all these factors. I've found that I tend to find the setting I like for a kite and then rarely, if ever, change it.


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John Welden
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« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2010, 05:42 PM »

I generally like the nose as far back as I can get away with.
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DWayne
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« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2010, 09:01 PM »

I generally like the nose as far forward as I can get away with.

Denny
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tpatter
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« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2010, 11:32 PM »

Here is some advice - I would fly the kite, most any kite, as-is from the designer for awhile before I started adjusting anything on it.    If you absolutely hate the kite, then mess with it right away I suppose, but if its that bad, it's not likely to improve much by just moving the nose a bit forward or back.

My favorite kites I've never adjusted at all - I just hook up the lines and fly.  Even with kites that I did adjust, I tend to find one setting and just stay with it - adjusting my flying to the kite rather than the kite to my flying.  Smiley

I've seen some really messed up kites after someone had a go at the bridle, standoffs, and attaching large weights to it.     

-Tom
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