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Author Topic: hooking lines to kite .  (Read 2302 times)
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flyjay77
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« on: September 05, 2010, 10:30 PM »

this may not be in the rite place ? but I am an old school kite guy and am use to clips on a kite . But I have been seing that the new kites dont have clips? I cant figure out how to conect the lines . dose anyone have a link to a video or can tell me how it works.

Jason,
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Jason Pearson
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Nitrobex
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« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2010, 10:33 PM »

It's a larks head knot

http://www.ehow.com/how_13480_make-larks-head.html -- text

Revolution Tutorial - Larks Head Knot (quad line stunt kite)
-- video
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flyjay77
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« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2010, 07:32 AM »

thats what I was thinking but didnt think that it would hold the full , didnt trust it , But I guess it works . thank you///

Jason,
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Jason Pearson
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flyjay77
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« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2010, 06:17 AM »

Can anyone tell me why this is the Standerd for kite fling nowdays ? why dont anyone use clips ? also what is the advantages on using this  on revolutions, I am just an old schooler and trying to get up to date .
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Jason Pearson
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lylenc
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« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2010, 06:43 AM »

Less weight and less snags without the clips.
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Craig     Walla Walla, WA     Just One More!
DonCrash
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« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2010, 07:02 AM »

Also clips tend to destroy the lines (eventually after hours of usage). It's more designed for the average stunt kite fliers (average stunt kite fliers are those who only fly once every few months or so-ish.
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Vented L'organic; Vortex; DS (closeted); Quantum (modded to taz); Ocius STD, UL, UL (2pt P90), SUL; Pi (Home made kite)
Jeepster
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« Reply #6 on: September 18, 2010, 07:42 AM »

thats what I was thinking but didnt think that it would hold the full , didnt trust it , But I guess it works . thank you///

Jason,

I use it on a SLK with 1200# line ... the kite makes the back end of my Jeep bounce when the wind is gusty.  No failures yet.  Was taught to use it by other BIG KITE fliers, so I'm not the first.

Cheers,
Tom
« Last Edit: September 18, 2010, 08:32 AM by Jeepster » Logged
DD
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« Reply #7 on: September 18, 2010, 07:48 AM »

Just an fyi, any kite boarding kites i have seen use the same larkshead to attach the lines to the kite so strength isnt a problem.
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Sine Metu!
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« Reply #8 on: September 18, 2010, 08:47 AM »

Also a larks head knott is self tightning so the more tensionon the line the less likely it is to come loose I use it on sul's and never had it slip.
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DWayne
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« Reply #9 on: September 18, 2010, 09:11 AM »

Is a larks head really a knot, or is it a hitch?

Denny
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DD
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« Reply #10 on: September 18, 2010, 10:18 AM »

technically a larks head knot is a larks head hitch knot. When a line is attached to something it is called a hitch; as in the hitching post.
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Sine Metu!
sealcove
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« Reply #11 on: September 18, 2010, 11:16 AM »

This is also known as a girth hitch.  Interestingly enough it is a very weak knot in terms of how it stresses the line.  While it has plenty of friction to hold well, because of the sharp bends a girth hitch uses, it actually reduces the strength of the material by about 30% at the sharpest bend in the knot.  I speculate that the loss isn't quite as bad with tiny diameter kite line, but it is probably close.

 
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DWayne
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« Reply #12 on: September 18, 2010, 11:30 AM »

This is also known as a girth hitch. 

And we have a winner.  Cool
A larks head is indeed a hitch and not a knot.  Wink

Denny
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sealcove
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« Reply #13 on: September 18, 2010, 11:40 AM »

Smiley

On the water it is more commonly called a cow hitch, and I am sure it has a bunch of other names. 
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chilese
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« Reply #14 on: September 18, 2010, 12:22 PM »

If you are concerned about reduced load capability.....

1 After you make the larkshead
2 Instead of attaching the knot to the tow point
3 Open the loop a bit, put thumb and forefinger through the loop
4 Make another larkshead
5 Attach tow point through 2nd larkshead

This will put 2 lines in the former weak area instead of 1
The first larkshead weak point is now in a much lower stress area
It adds a little itsy-bitsy teeny-weeny bit of weight to the tow point (for the super critical readers)

Don't know if there is a name for it. I just experimented with it one day when I noticed the increased wear spot on some sleeving.
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John Chilese: Las Vegas, NV
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