GWTW Forum
April 16, 2014, 11:49 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Forum Info Login Register Chat  
Welcome to the GWTW Forum.
Guests (non-registered users) can view the forum but are unable to post.  If you don't have anything to say then why would you bother to register?
One of the most popular sections of the GWTW Forum has long been the Swap Meet.  A great place to sell old, seldom flown kites or to get great deals on used (gently flown) kites.  Only registered users can see the Swap Meet section, let alone wheel and deal.  1000's (literally) of kites have changed hands thanks to the Swap Meet.
There are several more benefits to being a registered user, but you'll have to join our little community to find out all the "secrets".
Questions or concerns?  forum.gwtwkites@gmail.com

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Sunglasses - Some Advice Needed  (Read 1828 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
bfranz
Trade Count: (+3)
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 43


Location: Central New Mexico

« on: September 17, 2010, 10:24 AM »

I need a new pair and thought I'd ask for opinions here. I searched for earlier threads and found some info but it wasn't a lot so here goes.

I know UV protection is a must and from what I've read, UV 400 rating blocks 99-100% of UVA and UVB so that's a given. What about polarization? It adds $75-100 to the cost. I fly mostly in my back field at 6700' elevation and once in a while on grass (not a lot of lush grass in New Mexico). The nearest beach is 1000 miles away so no sand/water areas involved. I also wear them driving and hiking.

Wrap around style is sometimes recommended for additional UV shielding but I find this style to be uncomfortable - maybe I have a fat head or longer temple length. Thoughts?

Any help or suggestions are appreciated.
Logged
indigo_wolf
Trade Count: (+10)
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1142


Location: North of Washington, DC (USA)

« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2010, 10:39 AM »

A note on polarization.... you will find that it makes reading most LCD displays (GPS in the car, Cell phones, and all other geek toys) a royal pain in the ass.  I really really wish more companies spent the extra case on making double gradients (heavier iconel coating along the tops and bottoms) to kill glare off snow/ice.  I actually liked those a lot but hard to find from anyone besides Ray-Ban.   

J.C. swears by Maui Jims... I am a big fan of some of the Revo.... but that has as much to do with fit and base curve as anything else.

The curves vary from maker to maker and despite the lure of mail order, trying them one is much better.  Despite improvements, optical glass still strains the eyes less (at least me).  Non glare coatings are fingerprint magnets and have as many negatives as positives.

Most sunglasses are still an exercise in compromises and profit margins.

ATB,
Sam
Logged
chilese
Global Moderator
Trade Count: (+5)
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2887


Location: Las Vegas, NV

WWW
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2010, 11:37 AM »

Yes, still a Maui Jim fan.

(Wear a good hat with full wrap-around brim too)

Many sunglass "companies" are Ray-Ban under a different name. You're just paying for the designer name. And some Ray-Ban glasses are excellent.

Maui Jims can be be ordered with an optical prescription and most shops will properly fit them to your head.

Maui Jim has changed their website and become less technical, sadly. But here is their current page on it:

http://www.mauijim.com/onthewater/Technology.htm

Whatever you buy I suggest:

1 Buy glass instead of polycarbonate
2 Don't buy online
3 Try the glasses on outside in direct sunlight
4 Take your 3 top choices outside to compare
5 Sunglasses should not change the shape of objects at all when you slip them up and down over your eyes quickly
6 Make sure you are filtering 100% of bad UV
7 If you can look at reflected sunlight off water while testing, all the better
8 Look at some car windshields with the sunglasses. You should be able to see "patterns" of tint on them if the sunglasses are done well.
9 You want the coatings done in a manner that will keep them from getting scratched, not just applied to the outer surface.
10 Spring hinges with nickel alloy help keep glasses in good shape.
11 On Maui Jims, you can tell if the lens is glass because the Maui Jim logo on the glass is raised to the touch.
12 Don't buy designer glasses.

An honest pair of glass sunglasses will cost you between $150 and $250 without having a designer name attached to it.

Mine are the Typhoon model, and still available. I prefer Nylon frames. If you look closely, you can see the heavier coating along the top and bottom Sam referred to in his reply above.
http://tiny.cc/3yyj7

I've had mine for a few years now. No scratches and I'm not a delicate person.

Spend the extra money to properly protect your eyes. As a wise person once said:
"Your eyes are very important. Ask the man who has one."  Huh

« Last Edit: September 17, 2010, 12:51 PM by chilese » Logged

John Chilese: Las Vegas, NV
http://picasaweb.google.com/chilesej
ezme6
Trade Count: (+16)
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 775

Location: Subic Bay, Philippines

« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2010, 01:01 PM »

$10 sunglasses also work very fine.  Smiley
Logged

"Do what you like"
Turkey9186
Trade Count: (+6)
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 155

Location: USA, Fairfield/Cordelia CA

« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2010, 01:10 PM »

Because of the amount of time I spend on my road bike, and being blessed (cursed?) with light grey/blue eyes I have always worn dark wrap around polarized glasses. 
I do have a pair of Ray Bans from a few years ago that are okay.
Owned two pairs of Oakley Flak Jackets.  One lost, and one stolen..
Now have a couple pairs of Chili's I picked up at REI for less than the lens for the Oakleys.

Good suggestion to try on several styles and colors outside.  I prefer grey colored lenses, brown and blue tints cause me headaches.  Other people are different.

As for glass or poly?  If you stand any chance of being hit by an object, I would stick with polycarbonate.  I have been hit with small rocks that were thrown up by a car, scratched my plastic lenses, but protected my eyes.
Logged
Jeepster
Trade Count: (0)
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 124

Location: Washington, Il

« Reply #5 on: September 17, 2010, 01:54 PM »

As per my eye doctor in Tucson:

When you wear sunglasses, expensive or cheap, your pupils will open up due to the diminished light.  If you wear glasses without UV protection, then you're effectively opening up your pupils to allow more damaging rays to enter.  Like sun burning your skin, the negative results will not be immediate nor to the same degree for everyone.  Be extremely cautious with your eyes, don't accept any risk of damaging your eye sight.

Cheers,
Tom
« Last Edit: September 17, 2010, 06:35 PM by Jeepster » Logged
kiteking
Trade Count: (+10)
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 882


Location: Brookings, OR)

WWW
« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2010, 02:28 PM »

In Tucson you don't need sunglasses, because the sun is always shinning, all day every day, you get used to it.

Now when the sun goes down you might need night vision goggles to compensate for the lack of street lights
Logged

* *
"Wind to your back, Kite in the sky."

MikeM
Brookings, OR  - KP 4-11

* *
#518  -    #110883 -

Jeepster
Trade Count: (0)
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 124

Location: Washington, Il

« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2010, 03:02 PM »

In Tucson you don't need sunglasses, because the sun is always shinning, all day every day, you get used to it.

Now when the sun goes down you might need night vision goggles to compensate for the lack of street lights

Now Mike, you know that's not true!  The official number is only 86% ... the sun shines 86% of the available daylight hours.

Cheers mate,
Tom
Logged
mikenchico
Board Moderator
Trade Count: (0)
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2162


Location: ‪‪‪‪‪‎Chico, Ca

WWW
« Reply #8 on: September 17, 2010, 04:00 PM »

Jeepster just pointed out why you don't wear cheap sunglasses. I've always been a fan of Revo's, they block 100% of UVA, UVB & UVC along with 100% of Infrared while letting 50% More visible light through. At least they did, they changed all their lenses to polarized years ago which blocks 50% of the incoming light and they are to dark after 30 years of actually being able to see while wearing sunglasses. Luckily my last pair has lasted 12 years, if that isn't a good recommendation I don't know what is.
Logged

"Living is easy with eyes closed, misunderstanding all you see" John W Lennon

"People do not quit playing because they grow old, they grow old because they quit playing" George Bernard Shaw
ezme6
Trade Count: (+16)
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 775

Location: Subic Bay, Philippines

« Reply #9 on: September 17, 2010, 06:39 PM »

ZZ Top Cheap Sunglasses April 1980
Logged

"Do what you like"
onlye
Trade Count: (+16)
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 189


Location: Madison, MS

WWW
« Reply #10 on: September 18, 2010, 07:18 AM »

Jeepster just pointed out why you don't wear cheap sunglasses.  Luckily my last pair has lasted 12 years, ...

But for those of us with whose sunglasses have a life span of only a month or so.  (I have sat on and lost more pairs than I can remember; including the really nice $100+ ones)

My buddy is a cheap sunglasses and reading glasses wholesaler.  I buy them by the dozen.  My new absolute favorites are READER SUNGLASSES.  The reader part does not get in the way while driving or kite flying.  However, when I need to see a kite knot or read the map I can easily do this without putting on my readers.  (You younger flyers won't understand this till you make it over 40 or so).  Yes, you can get some really nice Maui Jim with readers, but I'd just sit on them or lose them in no time.

If you are interested in CHEAP reader sunglasses let me know.  I would be happy to pick you up a few pair from my buddy.
Logged

eric
forum member since 04/21/2001
and still can't fly like those darn videos
david barnby
Trade Count: (+3)
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 203


Location: France

« Reply #11 on: September 20, 2010, 01:31 AM »

easy to blow lots of dosh on shades - be careful. mj's, vuarnets, bolle's and revo's are (mainly) made to do a good job and not just dazzle onlookers with a brand

for the longest time ray bans have been just a branded product sold by an italian fashion conglomerate. long time ago the brand was owned by bausch & lomb and the lens used to be engraved with the name of this renowned optical glass maker they (supposedly) used. they are great shades but make your own mind up about value for tech vs value for brand and image

the mj's are designed for being on water where the polarizing is really advantageous - it is a pain when it causes patterns on the glass of cars in traffic or on screens of appliances. but they are built really sturdy and stay put perched on top of the head when not in front of eyes. the vuarnets are serious eyewear - wonderful in the mountains and they have great models that get by without the (fragile) coatings of others. contrast of these is great.

of course, this is only opinion generated from owning/wearing various versions of these over many years - it could be that today one company owns most of the brands. if you are going to look at higher price shades the store will let you walk outside and try them. look for contrast effect and tone effect that you like. i dont like glasses with metal bits for the nose because they go out of shape when not looked after and get stuck in hair but thats me - others might like them because they allow better venting

is like buying a pair of jeans - you can go to wallmart or spend hours in a boutique with a corresponding spectrum of prices. if you want to be picky i think the things to pick out are how the world looks through them, how comfortable they are and how you like yourself with them when you look in the mirror. assuming of course they provide the basic function of keeping things out (monster photons etc) that you dont want to reach your mincers

otherwise - rose tinted all the way

Logged
chilese
Global Moderator
Trade Count: (+5)
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2887


Location: Las Vegas, NV

WWW
« Reply #12 on: September 20, 2010, 01:45 AM »

You must be related to the Bard, little brother.

I had to read it through thrice, just for the prose.

Thanks.  Smiley
Logged

John Chilese: Las Vegas, NV
http://picasaweb.google.com/chilesej
rxburner
Guest
Trade Count: (0)
« Reply #13 on: September 20, 2010, 09:14 PM »

Ray Ban Cats have always served me well.   Glass, Gray...

Rx
Logged
randyg
Trade Count: (+4)
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 241


Location: Georgia

« Reply #14 on: September 21, 2010, 08:52 AM »

I use a pair of Oakley Pro M frames for road cycling and for kiting I was very fond of my Oakley Half Jackets until I lost them.  Embarrassed First pair of nice shades I've ever lost.

Now for running and mountain biking I use a pair of Tifosi shades (G3 I think) with the photocromatic lens and so far they work quite well. I am not too sure if they are dark enough for flying kites though. The upside is the are reasonably priced (~$60) and come with both a microfiber case/bag and a hardened nylon, zippered shell. Some models come with three sets of lens.
Logged

Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  


items purchased through the links below help support the forum

Our forum is made possible by the good folks whose ads appear in the right margin of the forum and by the members of our community (PayPal donation button at bottom of the page)
In case you missed it each ad is linked to the sponsors web site.  So please, take a moment and visit our sponsors sites as this forum wouldn't be possible with out them. >>>
Interested in running an ad for your business or kiting event?  Contact Steve at advertise.gwtwkites@gmail.com for a quote.


member support is greatly appreciated!

Cal Custom
kitekids.net



Untitled Document
J Hall Photography

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.8 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!