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Author Topic: Rebuild-able? (First topic!)  (Read 1373 times)
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« on: September 20, 2010, 10:00 PM »

Hello,

Well this isn't my first post, but I have been looking around the site after trying a 2 line kite for the first time.  I have been reading up on replacement parts and got some schooling via the chat about high end kites. 

So, while I was getting sleeping bags for my girls at REI and I noticed that they sold some Prizm brand sport kites and it got me thinking.  Are beginner kites easier to fix and do high end kites require more experience to work on, like fixing a carburetor in a buick vs redoing valves on a Ferrari?

The reason why I am asking is because I have no problems with buying a $200+ good kite, but I would hate to mess it up by opening up the hood and making it worse.

Thanks for the help,

Jeff

P.S. Like thge how to fly videos are there how to fix videos?
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DWayne
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« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2010, 10:17 PM »

Fixing one is about like fixing another. The higher end kite may be built a bit better so it may withstand a little more abuse.
Hint; when you see the kite rushing to the ground at a high rate of speed, rather than cringe and brace for the impact, let go of the lines. It will save you a lot of time and money repairing your kite.  Wink

Denny
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« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2010, 10:29 PM »

I also learned not to move may hands about and keep them at my sides and then push them out if I was about to crash, but I was not told to let them go.  Is it better that way?

When you say better made what does that mean?  It's easy to assume better parts, but are there more reinforcements or something along the sorts that have to be replaced?

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chilese
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« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2010, 11:02 PM »

I always teach new people to hold onto the straps, not put their hands through the straps.

And the 2nd thing I teach them to do is LET GO OF THE STRAPS if the kite is going to crash. Even in strong wind, the worst you will have to do is chase the kite. There is no faster way to get rid of downward velocity on a kite then to let go of the lines.

I totally agree with Denny.  Smiley
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John Chilese: Las Vegas, NV
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« Reply #4 on: September 20, 2010, 11:03 PM »

Really dude?  You came back to the forum to do this?
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-look to the sky with imagination, grasp the wind with outstretched arms and take flight
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« Reply #5 on: September 21, 2010, 07:55 AM »

Construction on most kites is very similar, where you'll run into problems is with the fittings on inexpensive kites and identifying the spars. But even then most fittings can be recycled to your new rods with some work getting the stoppers unglued. When you get into the $100-$150 range and above you'll find most kite use standard fittings and spars available from well stocked kite stores or here at GWTW.

Letting go of the lines works, I'd rather teach proper form and just say throw your hands forward like you were told before, a full body lunge/step forward is required in high winds though. Dropping the lines is a rookie move, but if it saves the kite it's all good. What everybody is trying to do is break the normal reaction of pulling back and over your head when the kite goes into a dive, that doesn't work  Wink

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« Reply #6 on: September 21, 2010, 12:47 PM »

My problem is with the unilateral "Let Go of the Handles" is you risk harm to anyone that is downwind of the kite.  Sad   Some of the larger kites are still carrying a fair amount of momentum at the end of a death glide. In a spin or tumble the nocks can skill start a lil 'un bawlin'  Post incident apologies to a torqued parent just doesn't seem like a fun way to end the day.

Had a single line burned of a  dual line by an SLK at a festival a couple of years ago. It was still fairly high up when it happened on a golf course full of kids and parents.  If I had let go of the other strap, odds were better than even that it was going to death spiral into someone.  A combination of walking, running and applying varying amounts of tension as the kite was spinning  and it came down intact and away from crowds.

Downwind velocity is just as important as downward velocity IMHO.

Maybe it's a powerkite thing, but I still skew towards not doing a full cutaway unless the kite is dragging you into traffic or over a cliff.

ATB,
Sam
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« Reply #7 on: September 21, 2010, 03:43 PM »

Regardless of letting go of the handles or not.... Higher end kites are usually built from very common materials including standard APA and TAPA connectors, Skyshark or Avia rods and normal end nocks, stand off connectors, ferules etc... so replacement parts should be very easily obtainable from any kite shop that realizes the necessity to carry replacement parts.  Steve and GWTW is one of those shops that should be able to completely rebuild any high end kite that you happen to damage and do so at a very reasonable price.

Most Skyshark rods are available under 10 bucks for the P-series and under 20 bucks for the PT (tapered) series.  End nocks, APA's and ferules usually under 2 bucks for a pair.  Center 'T' connectors can be a bit tricky as they do change from kite to kite, but still pretty easy to get and usually under 2 bucks.  Flying Wings Dynamic rods are usually slightly more than the Skyshark ones and a little harder to find but still fairly easy to get if you deal with a competent shop.

I wouldn't worry to much about replacement items and not being able to locate them.  If you can't find a specialized part, you always have the forum here and all the helpful members to steer you in the right direction.

Although the $200.00+ price tag on the higher end kite seems to be somewhat expensive....after flying that same kite for a year or longer and getting 100's of times more fun out of it, the price is mute and worth every penny spent.

Hope that helps.
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