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Author Topic: Best/easiest way to shorten a line?  (Read 1836 times)
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Scott Blake
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« on: October 06, 2010, 09:07 AM »

Hi all,

The lines for my little Micron are not the same length; they started out with the right about 1 inch longer and now its probably getting on closer to two inches.  As you can imagine, with a fast kite like that it definitely alters how you need to hold your lines and what you need to do to make it loop and such...and not making it easier.

I would like to even things out.  Catch is, I am not quite sure the best way to do this.  It looks like this:



So before I attempt to untie the red bit (on I am assuming the fliers end, not the kite end although I am not sure it makes a difference really), what exactly is that white line holding onto inside those knots and what kind of knots are they (so I can take off an inch or two from the white on the right side and then get it back into a similiar kind of group of knots to rehold it).

Its good I could figure out how to add a photo as trying to descibe that mess above in text was not easy!

Regards,

Scott
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Allen Carter
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« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2010, 09:38 AM »

The colored material is called Sleeving. The flying line runs all the way trough it. Two knots hold the loop, the third knot secures the sleeving to the end of the flying line. The knots are normally just plain old overhand knots. Untie the loop at one end of the long line, untie the stopper knot, making sure not ot let the end of the flying line disappear into the sleeving, and slide the sleeving down the apropriate amount and re-tie. Trim off the additionmal line. Melting the ends of line with a lighter is a good idea. Sometimes the end of the line is melted into the sleeving, or isn't sticking out enough to grab. You can use tweezers or whatever to fish out the end of the line, or cut a bit off the end of the sleeving if it's too melted.

Take the opportunity to make your lines exactly the same length. It might take a bit of fiddling, but it will be worth it.

Before you untie the loop, you might want to stretch the lineset. Normally, flying a full size kite a few hours will fully stretch lines, but if you've only used this set with a Micron, it might not be completely broken in and will continue to creep. Hook one end of the lines to something solid, and pull on the other end a lot. Don't pull too hard or too sharply, but give the lines a good slow stretch and release a half dozen times. After equalizing the lines do this again to make sure nothing slips.
« Last Edit: October 06, 2010, 09:47 AM by Allen Carter » Logged

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Scott Blake
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« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2010, 09:51 AM »

Ah, so the white line isn't somehow tied to those three knots, it is inside them and goes all the way to the 'end'.  On the bottom red one that little white spot is the very end of the white line right?

Ok, so when you say 'untie the loop at one end of the long line', which of the three knots is first?  The one with the white fleck where the very end of the white line is?  Or is that one the 'stopper knot'?

Now that I know what is going on inside there I am thinking with care you could probably do it any which way but can see that if you lose the white line into the sleeving you could cause yourself some serious aggro.  The end goal at least is now obvious; I need to get that white fleck pulled out about 2 inches and cut off and retied/melted.

Thanks!  I was really wondering what kind of knot could possibly be holding that white line to the red/blue ones with what looks like next to nothing to hold onto  Embarrassed
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Allen Carter
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« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2010, 09:58 AM »

  The end goal at least is now obvious; I need to get that white fleck pulled out about 2 inches and cut off and retied/melted.

You've got the idea.

Untie the two knots that hold the loop first, then untie the one at the end of the line/sleeve.
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bfranz
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« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2010, 01:08 PM »

If the flying line gets pulled into the sleeving you will need a simple tool called a sleever to repair things. The sleever is a doubled length of stiff, thin wire that is used to pull the line through the sleeve. Most kite shops sell them - I didn't see one on GWTW but that was a quick look - Steve probably can hook you up with one for a modest cost. I've found mine to be well worth the cost to make new linesets and adjust/repair existing ones. John Barresi has a video tutorial on the Kitelife forum that shows exactly how to do this - it's oriented toward quad lines but a dual set is done the same way.
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kiteking
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« Reply #5 on: October 06, 2010, 02:54 PM »

simple tool called a sleever to repair things.


I have made some from thin gauge guitar strings

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mikenchico
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« Reply #6 on: October 06, 2010, 02:56 PM »

In the absense of a sleeving tool a trip to your local hardware store or hobby shop for a thin piece of piano wire, just fold it in half and insert it through the sleeving then place the line in the loop and pull it back through. An old guitar string or even the thinnest floral wire will do in a pinch.

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Scott Blake
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« Reply #7 on: October 06, 2010, 08:46 PM »

I am going to be doing my best to have that line not go back into the sleeves at all which will make things a whole heck of a lot simpler; prevention being the best cure here I think.
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Scott Blake
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« Reply #8 on: October 06, 2010, 10:11 PM »

Hmm, yea, catch with that is I need over an inch which would almost eliminate the loop on one end or the other (kite end or flyer end); costing me a finger hold on the flyer side or the ability to get a larks head on the other end.  If I needed less that would indeed be easier I think.

The line ends are burnt on all of the sleeves but one (fortunately a right side one which might give me immediate access to the line); I can see the risk snipping the burnt bit off and not being able to get ahold of the line.  I am surprised these were not more even straight from the factory and they have stretched (unfavorably) after some hard flying making the right longer still.

I am confident this can get done, but am going to put it off until I am really in the mood for some finicky type work.
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mikenchico
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« Reply #9 on: October 06, 2010, 11:02 PM »

If you're right handed you probably favor that hand and stress that line a bit more. Do a quick re-pre-stretch on them before balancing them. Hook the kite end loops to something sturdy and grab the straps and lean back on them at 50% or so of their rating, slack and lean again, do it for a few minutes, unless you can leave them out and weight them evenly overnight.

To avoid this swap sides once in awhile or every time, it's also recommended to swap the handle & kite ends once in a while to move the wrap/wear point, it helps the lines to last longer.

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"Living is easy with eyes closed, misunderstanding all you see" John W Lennon

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Scott Blake
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« Reply #10 on: October 07, 2010, 01:26 AM »

I will give the stretch thing a go first; I wouldn't have thought these spectra lines would stretch much but hey, I am a noob!

edit - Wow, the stretch thing seemed to work.  Well, they became the same length and kept it under less tension (they were attached to a bolt in a door where I could get 50 feet of clear run outside).  Hopefully it maintains it when there is some wind next and I unwind them.

Regardless, thanks all, I at least now know all the options and how to do them (hopefully).
« Last Edit: October 07, 2010, 02:53 AM by Scott Blake » Logged
mikenchico
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« Reply #11 on: October 07, 2010, 07:43 AM »

Stretch is only around 3% on Spectra but the pre-stretch is to remove the "Creep" (no not that kind of creep) After the twist and the braid there are always some inconsistency's in the length of the fibers, the pre-stretch will elongate those fibers that are shorter and tighten up the braid until all the fibers share the load equally. Once done the lines will be pretty stable as long as they are used under their rated breaking point.

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Hadge
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« Reply #12 on: October 07, 2010, 08:02 AM »

For a quick 'in the field' fix, it's worth carrying a couple of line equalisers - basically a couple of pigtails made from bridle line with a loop at one end and a series of knots about 1/2" apart. Just unloop your flying lines from the straps, loop the equalisers to the straps and the line to knots then move the line to whichever knots  give you an equal length of line.



You may need more adjustment than this.
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