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Author Topic: Review lingo -- what does it all mean?  (Read 2218 times)
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Ang3lFir3
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« on: December 17, 2010, 10:09 PM »

So.... like many newbs I have been reading a lot of reviews!! yay!!! (no worries already selected my next kite... Ocius here i come)...

but things I want to know so that I can understand the references while reading some kites reviews are :

some one please define "deep" in reference to turtles ?
what is meant by "Itís not all French in its Turtle bias..." ?
as a matter of fact... someone just tell me the difference between "french" and "not french"... please?
does "light on the lines" mean less pull and more slack in the lines?
please someone help me define "old skewl" vs "new skewl" since I only know what I see now....

I am sure there is other stuff I didn't think of or remember yet..... thanks in advance Smiley
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Ca Ike
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« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2010, 10:34 PM »

Well Deep refers to how low the nose sits while in a turtle, French just refers to  the tuned characteristics since the dual standoff design originated in france as well as some of the flip tricks apparently but i haven't heard that confirmed.  As for old school vs new school (yes i hate that crappy phonetic spelling)...Old school refers to early stunt kite days where precision figure(pattern) flying and smooth rotational tricks(540, axel, lazy susan) were the fore front of the trick realm and routines were a blend of pattern flying and rotational tricks. New school refers to all the kite on crack, crazy pitch tricks(yo-yo) and the style of constant back to back flip and spin trick combos.  Thats about as simple as I can esplain it Smiley
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JimB
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« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2010, 01:31 AM »

There have been at least Four Schools of stunt flying that I can think of at the moment.

That's not counting truly Old School: kites without standoffs, flat out precision, no stalling: that sort of thing.

Can't get into it right now.

later. Wink
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inewham
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« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2010, 01:35 AM »

Really broadly speaking

Vintage  Kiss
  • anything pre 90s / pre Tracer
  • Precision kites
  • Fewer kitemakers, typically British, American, Australian
  • Often no standoffs

Old school -
  • anything pre 2001-ish
  • Typically we had team kites OR trick kites
  • before the STX / Nirvana
  • before people became obsessed with yoyos
  • kites upto and including Illusion Gemini
  • many producers of kites were British or American, Chinese were still  producing toy kites
  • Shorter standoffs, typically one per side
  • Short turbo/dynamic/active bridles
  • tight spins and oversteer

New school -
  • Most kites post 2003-ish
  • Polyvalents (do everything kites) became the norm
  • Heavily influenced by the STX / Nirvana
  • Emphasis on pitch tricks, especially yoyos
  • Many producers of kites were now French or German, some American Mfrs had their kites made by the Chinese who went on to produce their own sport kites
  • Longer standoffs, typically two per side
  • Return to static, 3 leg bridles but with tow points very wide/low
  • Wide spins, punch turns and no oversteer
  • In the past 3 or 4 years an emphasis on kites that lock into turtles, with the nose very low

Describing a kite as French typically means influenced by the flight characteristics of the STX/Nirvana and is applied to lots of kites in the new school category

These are very broad statements with obvious exceptions;
The French were heavily into polyvalents pitch tricks by the end of the 90s, it just took a while for the rest of us to catch on, Geminis are a crossover with a foot in both camps, there are new school kites with single standoffs etc. but you might get a general idea from this...
« Last Edit: December 18, 2010, 01:37 AM by inewham » Logged

stapp59
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« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2010, 08:22 AM »

Ian thanks for the classification and history info.  JimB I'm interested to see yours.

Steve
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thief
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« Reply #5 on: December 18, 2010, 09:16 AM »

oooh...should a dictionary be added into the FAQ area?
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Kites kayaks & corgis again!!!
Dolphinboy
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« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2010, 03:50 PM »

So.... like many newbs I have been reading a lot of reviews!! yay!!! (no worries already selected my next kite... Ocius here i come)...

but things I want to know so that I can understand the references while reading some kites reviews are :

some one please define "deep" in reference to turtles ?
what is meant by "Itís not all French in its Turtle bias..." ?
as a matter of fact... someone just tell me the difference between "french" and "not french"... please?
does "light on the lines" mean less pull and more slack in the lines?
please someone help me define "old skewl" vs "new skewl" since I only know what I see now....

I am sure there is other stuff I didn't think of or remember yet..... thanks in advance Smiley

The first thing to remember is that we use these descriptions because of experience flying kites of different types. So they make more sense once you've flown kites that fit the various characteristics. If you haven't had the chance to fly different types, well it's never going to make complete sense. Also, with many kites, there isn't always a distinct line when describing a kite and how it flies and tricks and many kites are somewhere in between.

Deep turtle kites sit on their back with the nose further down toward the ground. So the nose is "deep" as opposed to a kite that sits flatter like a plate when on it's back. They also tend to come out of tricks with a choppier / snappier look.

French when used as a flight characteristic means the kite is usually less spinny and does tricks edgier, less swoopy. They tend to click or snap from trick to trick as opposed to a kite that rolls from trick to trick in a smoother fashion. A kite that is kind of "rolly polly" is the opposite of French.

Light on the lines means a lighter feel or less pull. Now if someone describes a kite as "heavy" it could mean the bridle setting, nose back or "heavy" because the kite has less drive and seems heavy. Or they may mean a heavier feel, more pull. These often go hand in hand, but not always.

Old school / new school was pretty well covered. But again, kites evolved so it's more of a progression from there to here than a line between them.
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James -
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Stardragon
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« Reply #7 on: December 18, 2010, 06:06 PM »

Deep in reference to Turtles:  How far below the surface of the ocean you can find them.

French in reference to Turtle bias:  How the turtles are cooked.  Twists on French cuisine or the accompaniment of non-French ingredients in the cooking process.

French vs non-French:  Whether or not the tongue is used.

Old Skewl:  Spelled by recent graduates.  Refers to back in the days when children actually learned the important concepts to prepare them for adult life and/or college.  Girls might wear makeup with nice outfits and boys wore belts and pants that fit.

New Skewl:  Spelled by recent graduates.  Refers to present times when children could care less about learning things and teachers are no longer appreciated.  Makeup and outfits on girls either make them look like vampires or hookers.  Boys wear mascara, pants that are too big for them, and no belt.  The showing of underwear is common.

Light on the lines:  A reference to the inhaling of powdered drugs through the nose that means to save some for the next person.

Pop:  What we called soda back in the day.

Hard pop:  Soda spiked with alcohol.

Ron Cheesy Cool Cheesy
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Ca Ike
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« Reply #8 on: December 18, 2010, 07:33 PM »

Deep in reference to Turtles:  How far below the surface of the ocean you can find them.

French in reference to Turtle bias:  How the turtles are cooked.  Twists on French cuisine or the accompaniment of non-French ingredients in the cooking process.

French vs non-French:  Whether or not the tongue is used.

Old Skewl:  Spelled by recent graduates.  Refers to back in the days when children actually learned the important concepts to prepare them for adult life and/or college.  Girls might wear makeup with nice outfits and boys wore belts and pants that fit.

New Skewl:  Spelled by recent graduates.  Refers to present times when children could care less about learning things and teachers are no longer appreciated.  Makeup and outfits on girls either make them look like vampires or hookers.  Boys wear mascara, pants that are too big for them, and no belt.  The showing of underwear is common.

Light on the lines:  A reference to the inhaling of powdered drugs through the nose that means to save some for the next person.

Pop:  What we called soda back in the day.

Hard pop:  Soda spiked with alcohol.

Ron Cheesy Cool Cheesy
Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy
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Ang3lFir3
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« Reply #9 on: December 19, 2010, 04:48 PM »

Wow ask and ye shall receive!!! Smiley thanks guys....
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Ang3lFir3
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« Reply #10 on: December 19, 2010, 04:49 PM »

Deep in reference to Turtles:  How far below the surface of the ocean you can find them.

French in reference to Turtle bias:  How the turtles are cooked.  Twists on French cuisine or the accompaniment of non-French ingredients in the cooking process.

French vs non-French:  Whether or not the tongue is used.

Old Skewl:  Spelled by recent graduates.  Refers to back in the days when children actually learned the important concepts to prepare them for adult life and/or college.  Girls might wear makeup with nice outfits and boys wore belts and pants that fit.

New Skewl:  Spelled by recent graduates.  Refers to present times when children could care less about learning things and teachers are no longer appreciated.  Makeup and outfits on girls either make them look like vampires or hookers.  Boys wear mascara, pants that are too big for them, and no belt.  The showing of underwear is common.

Light on the lines:  A reference to the inhaling of powdered drugs through the nose that means to save some for the next person.

Pop:  What we called soda back in the day.

Hard pop:  Soda spiked with alcohol.

Ron Cheesy Cool Cheesy

LOL !!! funnah!! Smiley Smiley Smiley
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