GWTW Forum
April 25, 2014, 12:02 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Forum Info Login Register Chat  
Welcome to the GWTW Forum.
Guests (non-registered users) can view the forum but are unable to post.  If you don't have anything to say then why would you bother to register?
One of the most popular sections of the GWTW Forum has long been the Swap Meet.  A great place to sell old, seldom flown kites or to get great deals on used (gently flown) kites.  Only registered users can see the Swap Meet section, let alone wheel and deal.  1000's (literally) of kites have changed hands thanks to the Swap Meet.
There are several more benefits to being a registered user, but you'll have to join our little community to find out all the "secrets".
Questions or concerns?  forum.gwtwkites@gmail.com

Pages: 1 ... 4 [5] 6 ... 9   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Bzar 2011 build thread  (Read 25160 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
WinterDaze
Trade Count: (+1)
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 402


Location: Melbourne, Australia

« Reply #60 on: July 21, 2011, 06:53 AM »

!!!!4000 reads!!!!

Congrats!
Logged

WinterDaze AoF
sugarbaker
Trade Count: (+7)
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 697


Location: Seattle, WA

« Reply #61 on: July 22, 2011, 10:23 PM »

I lied... the next post will not show the attachment of the tail strap (because I don't have those pics off the camera and onto my computer yet).  So, instead, I will move on to the leading edge.  The leading edge, along with the nose is one of the hardest parts to place on the kite in my opinion.  The cutouts for the leading edge to standoff connectors need to be cut precisely, and the sewing of the leading edge will be visible once the kite is complete (and it is difficult to sew and keep the fabric in the right place).  It should be said that I will typically use black thread to sew on the leading edge, but for this project, I've used white so that it can be seen.  I won't be showing the sewing pattern until a later post.

To start, I measure out two strips of 2" dacron (in my case I've used mylar coated dacron, but most of you will not have this material since I snapped up the last 40 yards in existence from Paul Shirey... regular dacron is fine).  I measure it out by taping it to the plan as seen here.



It is important to add about 1.5" to the length that will be folded over to re-enforce the tip.



Before removing the stip of dacron from the plan, I make marks where the leading edge cutouts will be.  I've marked my plans where the spreaders will intersect, and adjusted the cutout spaces accordingly (I've made the cutout space slightly longer than on the plan, as a larger cutout will give a more gradual/smoother line along the leading edge).  You should also note that the lower spreader cutout is a little bit off from where Werner intended it to be... this is noted on his site.  I have not pictured my plan in it's marked up state, but be sure to view the framing diagram on the site to see exactly how far from the upper spreader the lower spreader should be placed.  Adjust the cutout accordingly. Also note that I have made a mark for the yo yo stopper... I will not be cutting out this section, but I will make a small hole for a zip tie to pass through.



Once you have one of the leading edges marked and cut to length, I tape it to a table and tape the next piece (for the other side) right next to it and mark the second strip to be symmetrical to the first.



Once both sides are marked and cut, I fold them in half lengthwise.  Then fold over the 1.5" tab at the end (note that for my next build I may increase this to 2 inches for the additional length of re-enforced wing tip material.



now, with the wing tip folded over, and the leading edge folded in half, there is a small amount that sticks out annoyingly.  simply cut it off with a straight edge and razor blade (then pass a lighter along the edge just to keep it from fraying).



ok.  I'm going to show how I prepare my leading edge connector spaces in the next post...  stay tuned. 
« Last Edit: July 23, 2011, 11:59 AM by sugarbaker » Logged
sugarbaker
Trade Count: (+7)
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 697


Location: Seattle, WA

« Reply #62 on: July 26, 2011, 11:49 PM »

with the leading edge cut to length and folded, I then prepare the spreader connector cutouts.  I like to have a covered connector to avoid snags while flying (as do most of the kites on the market at this point).  Usually I cut out a slot in the forward facing portion of the leading edge at the connection point for the upper and lower spreaders... for this build I'm going to try an idea I got from my recently purchased Silverfox Pro.  Instead of cutting out a slot, I'm going to only cut two holes for the spar to pass through. This will be more obvious from pictures if you're not familiar with the Silverfox Pro.

First, I found a washer that has a half inch hole (large enough for a P200 with a vinyl end cap to pass through).  The point of the washer is to be a guide for my soldering iron/hot cutter.



Having already marked the leading edge strip, I cut 4 holes on the half of the strip that will be on the front side of the kite (two holes for each spreader connector. Make sure you make each strip symmetrical.  The first pic shows the upper spreader portion, second pic shows the lower spreader portion.  Remember that soldering irons will burn through your fingers as fast as the nylon material you intend it to cut... be careful and don't give yourself a reason to visit the ER.





Notice that with the upper spreader, I've put the holes on the outside of my guide lines with the connection point centered between them.  For the lower spreader, I've biased the holes towards the tip... this will allow a small amount of extra sliding room when taking apart the leading edge if needed.  (I usually store my kites with the leading edge at full length, but do occasionally break them down).

Now, to finish prepping the leading edge, I apply double sided tape that will hold the fabric in place while I sew.  I place tape on the back facing half of the leading edge, close to the fold so it is easier to attach the sail.  Then, between the holes I cut for spreader connectors, I place a piece of tape on the front facing half of the leading edge directly between the holes... taping in this way will help when piecing together the frame. 



The leading edge is now prepared to attach to the sail.  This seems like a good time to explain that I had some trouble sewing the particular material I used for my leading edge.  My trouble came in that the folded material did not want to feed evenly (a product of my sewing machine and the glossy/slippery mylar surface of the material I used).  For future builds, I will also be gluing the leading edge as I did the sail panels.  My sail is complete, but not as beautiful as it could have been had I glued the leading edge in addition to taping it.  I also used white thread on the leading edge for the purpose of this documentation... in the future I will use black to match the material and hide any flaws that come up while sewing.  Anyway, I'm all packed to move, so it will be a couple of weeks until my next post.  Coming up I will show how I attach and sew the nose webbing and then I'll continue the documentation of the frame build and onto the bridle and final construction.  Earlier in this thread I mentioned documenting the storage sleeve build.  I will still do that, but will probably start a second thread as it is not specific to the B'zar 2011 kite.

Logged
Ca Ike
Trade Count: (+24)
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1698


Location: Stockton, CA

« Reply #63 on: July 27, 2011, 12:07 AM »

That method of cutting the LE for the spar has been used on several kites.  However you will need to elongate that hole a bit or the spar won't fit through easily.  I'd also sew across the cover about 1/4 inch from the edge to keep the folded dacron together at the fittings so you don't have to bother with it while inserting the spars.
Logged
sugarbaker
Trade Count: (+7)
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 697


Location: Seattle, WA

« Reply #64 on: July 27, 2011, 05:39 PM »

I've threaded spars through my competed leading edge a few times now without problems.  I may still sew the space between the holes, but at the moment the tape I placed prior to attaching to the sail has been enough.  I don't expect to be taking the spars in and out so often that it will make much difference.  We'll see. 
Logged
positivo
Trade Count: (0)
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 31

Location:

« Reply #65 on: August 01, 2011, 12:49 AM »

Meanwhile, at the other side of the Atlantic Ocean:

[attachments older than 90 days deleted by admin]
Logged
coogee
Trade Count: (0)
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 284


Location: Sydney Australia

« Reply #66 on: August 01, 2011, 03:41 AM »

Great shot and the hot colours look good
    Mike
Logged
sugarbaker
Trade Count: (+7)
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 697


Location: Seattle, WA

« Reply #67 on: August 14, 2011, 10:51 AM »

I'm settling into my house in Reno... which means more documentation of my build is coming soon.  Don't give up on me, I refuse to leave a project unfinished!
Logged
sugarbaker
Trade Count: (+7)
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 697


Location: Seattle, WA

« Reply #68 on: September 01, 2011, 09:16 PM »

so, I left off with the preparation of the leading edge.  I set those pieces aside long enough to sew on the tail piece/spine tunnel. 

Using double sided tape, I attach the tail strap to the posterior of the kite at a pre-measured distance.  The picture shows that it overlaps the kite by approx 3 inches. The placement is not arbitrary.  To find the exact spot in which the tail strap will sit, I fold it in half with a mock spine (and tail piece) slid into the velcro tunnel.  I then place it on the sail such that the leech line will have a very slight curve in it when it is wrapped back toward the center T.  Unfortunately, I have forgotten to take a picture of this step, so I'll trust that if clarification is needed, you can just shoot me a message.  anyway, here is the strap stuck to the sail prior to sewing. Note how it exactly matches the mylar spine seem reinforcement. Also note that I have used a sharpie and drawn 2 diagonal lines that I will sew over.  The point of these is so that I do not sew through the leech line at the tip of the tail.  They also follow the seem in the trailing edge, so the thread will be somewhat disguised on the front aspect of the kite.     



To sew the strap, I turn the sail so the front is facing up.  Care must be taken so as not to displace the strap, as it is only attached with fabric adhesive tape.  I start at the very tip of the tail, and I use the seems on the trailing edge and the spine re-enforcement as a guide.  My machine is set to the default straight stitch.  This will make it easy to follow the existing stitches and it will ensure that I have enough width in the spine tunnel for the spar to slide through.  Sew slowly and make sure the machine is set to have the needle down when you stop.  This way you can make the corner without having the thread go crazy.



After making the first turn, I follow the outside edge of the zig-zag stitch on the spine.  Stitching up to what will be the top of the spine strap/tunnel, the stitch length may need to be adjusted before making the turn.  It is crucial that you make the turn early enough that the top of the strap will be secured, but late enough that you will not stitch the tunnel closed on the back side. 



When securing the top of the strap, as you stitch across the spine, the stitch length may need to be adjusted again to land on the exact far edge of the spine stitch, so you can have symmetry and a guide to stitch back down the other side of the strap.  See where the needle is stopped just before I turned back towards the tail.



On the return stitch, prior to making the last turn to complete the stitch, cut off the original threads above and below the sail so they don't get sewn into the stitch when you reach the end.  It wouldn't be a huge problem to sew over them, it's just not as aesthetically pleasing.



Here is my completed stitch. Please ignore the holes at the top, as I had a first attempt and found that the strap was to far up, so I cut the original stitch and re-did it.  Note how the straight stitch follows the previous zig-zag. 



More coming.

Logged
coogee
Trade Count: (0)
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 284


Location: Sydney Australia

« Reply #69 on: September 03, 2011, 04:20 AM »

Hi Sugarbaker
                   nice to see you back.
  Mike
Logged
sugarbaker
Trade Count: (+7)
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 697


Location: Seattle, WA

« Reply #70 on: September 03, 2011, 07:57 AM »

thanks for the welcome back... I know it's been a slow thread for a while, but hopefully over the next week or so I can wrap up the sail and the frame and move onto the bridle documentation. 
Logged
positivo
Trade Count: (0)
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 31

Location:

« Reply #71 on: September 05, 2011, 02:59 AM »

we are a patient crowd, the trick kite fliers   Roll Eyes
Hope all's well at the new place!
Logged
Ca Ike
Trade Count: (+24)
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1698


Location: Stockton, CA

« Reply #72 on: September 06, 2011, 11:59 PM »

WB Sugarbaker.  You mentioned having feeding problems on the folded over part of your LE at the wing tips and I notice from your pics that you folded the dacron so that when you have it in place on the LE the mylar backing is on the outside.  What I have done on my kite projects with mylar backed as well as other dacron LE material is fold the 1-2 inch extra so that when its in place the reinforcement is on the inside of the LE tunnel.  I also tape or glue the edge and run a zigzag on a 2x2 setting along the edge (across the width) to prevent possible spar snag on the end of the material when installing the framing.  This gives a very clean looking tip and eliminates feeding problems caused by the mylar as well as the need to trim that excess.  Also when sewing mylar it helps to add some 1/4 inch wide strips of painters tape or cloth tape to the back side (i always sew with the face of the kite up as much as possible) next to the stitch line, not only to protect the mylar from damage by the feed grabber but to help with feeding.
Logged
sugarbaker
Trade Count: (+7)
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 697


Location: Seattle, WA

« Reply #73 on: September 13, 2011, 06:18 PM »

ok.  I must apologize now... in my preparation for moving to Reno, I have misplaced some of the pics that I took to document the leading edge portion of this build.  I have some for taping the leading edge to the sail, but have lost the pics showing how I glue the leading edge, and how I sew it to the sail.  I will post what I have.

As shown in a previous post, I place fabric tape on the back side of each leading edge, close to the fold (center).  I start at the wing tip and remove the first portion of tape backing.  Being sure to line up the sail wing tip to the very tip of the leading edge material, I begin to stick the sail to the edge.  Good lighting will help with proper placement of the sail, which should come right to the center fold of the leading edge.



I then work my way to the nose... removing tape backing a little at a time and placing the sail fabric over the top of it. Always being sure it is flat with no wrinkles and pressed into the center of the leading edge.





In the next pic, you can see that my frame markings on the sail line up exactly in the center of my frame cutouts in the leading edge.  Also note that I do not peel the tape on the front portion (between the cut outs) of the leading edge until I've completely taped the sail to the back of the leading edge.



As I get to the end, you'll notice that I have given myself approximately 1 inch of extra leading edge material.  It will be cut off prior to sewing on the nose.



Repeat this portion with the opposite leading edge.  Note that you will be working in the opposite direction, and be sure you are oriented front and back before you begin to tape.  (I have made the mistake of having my frame cutouts in the back of the kite on previous builds... don't make this mistake).

Because I have lost some pictures, I will make some recommendations now that will not have visual aids to support them.
1. It is important to secure the front portion of the leading edge to the sail as well.  I use a glue stick, and apply it to only the portion of the leading edge that will be sewn... no glue should be placed where frame material will end up.  I avoid tape in this area, as it gums up my sewing machine.  The reason to secure this flap is to help with the evenness of sewing/feeding through the machine.  You will note later that I had some feed problems and they will be seen in the unevenness of the stitch near the nose on each leading edge.  I will point this out later.  To avoid this problem, I would do as suggested in a response to this thread... place some masking tape over the glossy portion of the leading edge for sewing.  This will help it feed evenly through the machine.  I've never had this problem with the mylar free dacron I have used in the past.

2. For this build I chose to use a serpentine stitch for the leading edge.  This proved to be a mistake, as I have had much better success using a regular zig-zag stitch in the past.  I would recommend a zig-zag stitch and will use it in future builds.  I also used white thread in order to show the stitch (although now I regret it as the pictures have been lost for the sewing of the leading edge).  I much prefer to use black in this portion... and will in the future.

3. remember to remove the tape backing on the front half of the leading edge (which will keep the portion between the frame cutouts from coming up when threading the leading edge frame through the tunnel later on.  I would also not discourage anyone from sewing this portion with a single straight stitch to ensure a permanent bond.

That does it for this post.  Up next is the nose.

and here, for viewing enjoyment is some visual bliss (as I have neglected to post a pic of the day for quite some time).  This is a recent hot air balloon festival I attended with my wife... perhaps I'll sew up one of these next.

Logged
sugarbaker
Trade Count: (+7)
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 697


Location: Seattle, WA

« Reply #74 on: September 20, 2011, 09:38 PM »

before I move on to the pictures of the nose, I'll show you a quick close up of the wing tip detail.  Note that in these pictures I have punched two holes in the wing tip that will be the anchor point for the leading edge tensioning. 



The important thing to take away from this is the stitch pattern on the leading edge.  I start near the center of the wingtip, work my way down, back stitch to the center, stitch down again, then make the right angle to stitch toward the nose.  when I reach the end of what would be the folded back portion of the leading edge material, I switch to the serpentine stitch (zig-zag on most of my builds, but serpentine for this one).  Of course there are other ways to start the leading edge seam, but I like this way because it is simple.  I would admit that I have probably done this slightly different with each build and may someday land on a style I stick with. 

Now, lets look at the nose.  and remember my disclaimer ** this is a variation to the plan **. I start with a piece of seatbelt material (not the only choice of material, but it was easy to get locally when I lived in Seattle, so thats what I use at the moment).  I used 2" wide material for this build, but have used 3" material with equal success and aesthetic value.  I cut the material long enough that when folded over it will completely cover the nose of the sail with some slop (in this case approximately 12").  The initial piece is cut with scissors, as I hot cut the nose to shape after it is sewn on the sail.  I fold the material in half and crease the fold as best I can for reference.  Then I apply some adhesive tape to both halves (long way) to hold the nose in place for the first seams.



At this point, I center the nose on the sail and fold it over so the tape holds it in place.  Note in this picture the length of nose material.  Also note the unevenness of the leading edge stitches from left to right.  These seams were sewn using the same stitch settings on the sewing machine, but due to some issues I had during sewing (feed issues) they turned out this way.  Also be assured that I will never point this out to anyone again.



The first two stitches I make are lined up with the spine fabric.  I don't mark anything, I just eye it and go.  I go down, back and down again for both stitches and then tie off the thread.  Again, I normally do this with black thread so the stitching doesn't stand out.  It's hard to get good even stitches when you are stitching forward and backward.  To avoid messy stitches, you can stitch down... rotate sail 180 degrees, stitch back, then repeat (it is easier to guide the stitching in the forward direction because you can see where the needle will hit the fabric).  Laziness has kept me from making theses stitches pristine.  later when the frame is in the sail, no one will care except for me and fellow kite makers with an eye for these details.



The next stitches are made in the same manor.  They are the seams that the leading edge frame material will butt up against, so I recommend multiple passes here as well.  To determine their angle, I do make a small mark on the leading edge that can't be seen in the pictures.  I set the seams so they are perpendicular to the leading edge at the nose.  I start the sewing at the edge and aim for the end of the first stitches I made (as you can see in the picture).



Now, before making more stitches, I cut off the excess material.  I use a metal straight edge and a soldering iron to hot cut the material.  By hot cutting, the edge is melted together.  It is a little bit of a trick to line the edge up with the leading edge material and not melt the area you want to preserve.  Just be sure before you cut.  Fewer passes with the hot cutter is best, but may take 2 or three passes unless you have a better tool than I do.  As you make more passes, the material will melt, but it will also start to get thicker as it melts back... also be sure you have the material on a surface you don't care about (as with any hot cutting). 



I do make two more stitches on the inside of the leading edge going toward the tip of the nose.  These stitches keep the nose material from flapping out when the frame material is inserted.  I follow the leading edge and just eye it while I sew to get the line.



It is important to sew the outer leading edge of the nose even though it is melted together.  I'll save it for another post, as this one is getting long.  More to come.
« Last Edit: September 20, 2011, 09:42 PM by sugarbaker » Logged
Pages: 1 ... 4 [5] 6 ... 9   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  


items purchased through the links below help support the forum

Our forum is made possible by the good folks whose ads appear in the right margin of the forum and by the members of our community (PayPal donation button at bottom of the page)
In case you missed it each ad is linked to the sponsors web site.  So please, take a moment and visit our sponsors sites as this forum wouldn't be possible with out them. >>>
Interested in running an ad for your business or kiting event?  Contact Steve at advertise.gwtwkites@gmail.com for a quote.


member support is greatly appreciated!



Untitled Document
J Hall Photography

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.8 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.2.1 © 2008-2009
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!