GWTW Forum
July 23, 2014, 11:12 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Forum Info Login Register Chat  
Welcome to the GWTW Forum.
Guests (non-registered users) can view the forum but are unable to post.  If you don't have anything to say then why would you bother to register?
One of the most popular sections of the GWTW Forum has long been the Swap Meet.  A great place to sell old, seldom flown kites or to get great deals on used (gently flown) kites.  Only registered users can see the Swap Meet section, let alone wheel and deal.  1000's (literally) of kites have changed hands thanks to the Swap Meet.
There are several more benefits to being a registered user, but you'll have to join our little community to find out all the "secrets".
Questions or concerns? Contact Steve ... just drop an email to: forum.gwtwkites@gmail.com

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 ... 6   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: ITW Kymera from Barresi...  (Read 10084 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Ca Ike
Trade Count: (+24)
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1705


Location: Stockton, CA

« Reply #30 on: December 31, 2011, 11:30 PM »

Well I got the Kymera that was for sale on the forum here. Had a chance to try it out yesterday. Flies well.
I let my 11 year old daughter give it a try and she killed it...

Soo, I need to order the part that connects the spine to the spreader (whatever the technical term is)...

I dont see parts on the site that sells the kite.

Any idea where to get it?

Kirby
THat was one thing we were worried about with the weights on the spine right at the center T that a hard nose plant would snap the T or the spine at the T where most kites the T slides up in a hard nose plant.  Did the ferrule in the lower spreader break too?
« Last Edit: December 31, 2011, 11:37 PM by Ca Ike » Logged
kepople
Trade Count: (+7)
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 378

Location:

« Reply #31 on: January 01, 2012, 11:10 PM »

I will check it tomorrow but I don't think so.

K
Logged
Kitelife
Trade Count: (+2)
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 390


Location: Portland, OR USA

WWW
« Reply #32 on: January 02, 2012, 02:40 AM »

I've broken my leading edge a couple times during normal use, but haven't snapped any center ferrules (and I've flown it in up to 25mph - not recommended)... Same story for Spence Watson, minus the 25mph... He learned dual line tricks on the Kymera, no breakage.

If you nose plant, expect to break something eventually.

My 2 cents. Wink
Logged

John Barresi
Editor/Publisher
Kitelife Magazine
Ca Ike
Trade Count: (+24)
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1705


Location: Stockton, CA

« Reply #33 on: January 02, 2012, 03:35 AM »

I've broken my leading edge a couple times during normal use, but haven't snapped any center ferrules (and I've flown it in up to 25mph - not recommended)... Same story for Spence Watson, minus the 25mph... He learned dual line tricks on the Kymera, no breakage.

If you nose plant, expect to break something eventually.

My 2 cents. Wink
  This is true enough John and the kite gods know I've broken my fair share of spines, ferrules, spreaders and LLE's, HOwever, the T used on your Kymera (R-sky type i guess its called) it probably the weakest T out there.  I've broken several on a few different kites that have c-clips locking the T in place while doing fade launches in thick grass.  Always breaks at the end the spine goes through.
Logged
Kitelife
Trade Count: (+2)
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 390


Location: Portland, OR USA

WWW
« Reply #34 on: January 02, 2012, 03:02 PM »

Ah, you're talking about the t-piece, not the ferrule - duh on me, got it now...

I don't doubt your experience, I'm just surprised as Spence and I have both run my kites through the ringer and haven't broken one yet.
Logged

John Barresi
Editor/Publisher
Kitelife Magazine
Ca Ike
Trade Count: (+24)
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1705


Location: Stockton, CA

« Reply #35 on: January 02, 2012, 03:35 PM »

Ah, you're talking about the t-piece, not the ferrule - duh on me, got it now...

I don't doubt your experience, I'm just surprised as Spence and I have both run my kites through the ringer and haven't broken one yet.
The beter you get the less you break, or that how it's supposed to go Tongue  The true newbie "crap its heading for the ground" panic yank, full power drive nose plant will break that T every time but in some ways i guess its better than breaking the spine.  I think sometimes kite makers forget that not everyone that picks up their kites can avoid hard nose plants or other damaging crashes.
Logged
DWayne
Trade Count: (+10)
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1356


Location: Corning, Ca.

« Reply #36 on: January 02, 2012, 03:39 PM »

Preventing nose plants is super easy, just let go of the straps.  Wink

Denny
Logged

I always wanted to be a procrastinator..........
I just never got around to it.
tpatter
Trade Count: (+21)
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1936

Location: Seattle, WA

WWW
« Reply #37 on: January 02, 2012, 03:56 PM »

I think the best kite for the 'turbo nose plant' is a solid-carbon framed one like the RockOn or Beetle,  it's  alot to ask of a capable trick kite to be able to survive that kite of punishment with no dmage for more than the occasional oops.
Logged

6 kite tom
Kitelife
Trade Count: (+2)
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 390


Location: Portland, OR USA

WWW
« Reply #38 on: January 02, 2012, 05:39 PM »

Nothing like a broken kite to encourage better skills. lol

Not making light, just saying. Wink
Logged

John Barresi
Editor/Publisher
Kitelife Magazine
Ca Ike
Trade Count: (+24)
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1705


Location: Stockton, CA

« Reply #39 on: January 02, 2012, 06:04 PM »

Nothing like a broken kite to encourage better skills. lol

Not making light, just saying. Wink
Too true lol
Logged
Ca Ike
Trade Count: (+24)
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1705


Location: Stockton, CA

« Reply #40 on: January 03, 2012, 12:50 PM »

Kirby.......You may want to consider this: Without a C-clip above the Center-T a hard nose
plant can cause damage to your sail. So, it's a lot easier and cheaper to replace a Center T
than it will be for you to repair a sail. I mention this, because it happened to me. I doubt
there are very many beginners that learned early on to let go of the flight straps before they
nose planted.   Roll Eyes
Letting go of the flight straps can be a bad idea in many ways. The least of which is no control over what the kite will do after not to mention the fact that most beginners I help out either have  the straps on their wrists or use the finger straps. I teach people to run to the kite like they want to catch it before it hits then teach em  how to snap it into a flare landing as they get used to not panicking.
Logged
Kitelife
Trade Count: (+2)
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 390


Location: Portland, OR USA

WWW
« Reply #41 on: January 03, 2012, 02:08 PM »

I have to agree with Norm 100%... A rare break of a $2 (or whatever) t-piece far outweighs the cost and grief of repairing or replacing your sail, which IS very likely to be damaged from a nose plant if your t-piece is free floating without stoppers.

Learning to step into the kite or throwing your hands forward (depowering) at the moment of a nose plant or solid crash is a very useful skill, you'll see a lot of fliers do this, myself included.
Logged

John Barresi
Editor/Publisher
Kitelife Magazine
madhabitz
Trade Count: (+4)
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 781


Location: Pleasanton, CA

« Reply #42 on: January 03, 2012, 02:36 PM »

Learning to step into the kite or throwing your hands forward (depowering) at the moment of a nose plant or solid crash is a very useful skill, you'll see a lot of fliers do this, myself included.

I'm somewhat of an expert on face-planting kites..... or at least I should be, as many times as it's happened to me. My "old" Hypnotist took it like a champ. I could never figure out how it survived so much punishment. Just when I could claim to finally be out of that unplanned landing stage, I'd start trying to learn something else and it would be back to the face plants. I had a line snap once and the kite was spinning out of control-- knew it would be a terrible result if I let it hit the ground, but the thing is, I had enough time to think, to figure out if I walked forward it would slow the spinning way down. I walked and it did slow down, enough for a very gentle landing.

Couple of weeks ago, we had a pretty big wind going. I went out to my favorite park with my Mamba and tried to fly it. The wind was about 10mph, but the gusts were a heavy duty. More than that, each gust came from a different direction. I'd just about decided to break out the SLKs for the day instead when a huge gust caught my kite in the back and down it went. Hard. It happened so fast, there wasn't even time for panic. I broke a spine and feel lucky that's all the damage there was. I'd guess inexperience kept me from reacting instinctively, from muscle memory.  Running forward. Have to remember that for the next crisis.

Ordered a couple of new spines and am back up and running. Now if I could just coordinate a few hours off with a nice breeze. ;-)

Nancy


Logged

"I haven't failed. I've just found ten-thousand ways that won't work."   -Thomas Edison
tpatter
Trade Count: (+21)
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1936

Location: Seattle, WA

WWW
« Reply #43 on: January 03, 2012, 03:32 PM »

A good early trick to learn is the belly landing / popup launch / fade.  Get that down and the flick-flack (non-French) is easy to learn, so you get 4 in 1.

It's gets the flyer comfortable with the kite being near / touching the ground but under control and also helps recovering from unplanned nose-plants when you are learning other new tricks and the kite somehow ends up powering down the window.  A nice quick one and it even looks planned!  Smiley
Logged

6 kite tom
Adamld13
Trade Count: (+7)
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 317


Location: Calgary, Alberta

« Reply #44 on: January 03, 2012, 03:32 PM »

I dont let go of the straps very often but sometimes you catch a wing tip in high winds and the kite does the "death spin". I find letting go of one of the straps and running forward seems to get it down safely and slowly. I think in my 2 years of flying I have done this twice....Def a last resort in my opinion.

Logged

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 ... 6   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  


items purchased through the links below help support the forum

Our forum is made possible by the good folks whose ads appear below and by the members of our community (PayPal donation button at bottom)
In case you missed it each ad is linked to the sponsors web site.  So please, take a moment and visit our sponsors sites as this forum wouldn't be possible with out them.
Interested in running an ad for your business or kiting event?  Contact Steve at advertise.gwtwkites@gmail.com for a quote.

Kite Classifieds Ad
Kite Classifieds

A Wind Of Change
A Wind Of Change

Kitebookie
Kitebookie.com

Untitled Document

Untitled Document
Untitled Document

Untitled Document
Untitled Document


Untitled Document
DOLLAR SHAVE CLUB

Support the GWTW Forum

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.8 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.2.1 © 2008-2009
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!