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Author Topic: Nikon D5000 2 Year Review  (Read 3604 times)
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chilese
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« on: August 19, 2011, 02:31 AM »

The equivalent of the Elixir or Gemini debate in cameras would be

Canon or Nikon?

They are both excellent camera lines with a model for any budget.
For my budget 2 years ago, I went with the mid-size sensor (4 cm2) Nikon D5000 with the 2 kit lenses.

2 years and 2 weeks later:
The camera has been through about 33,000 photos (about 45 pics/day (curse the continuous shooting mode, I have grown soft)). You do have to remember how many times the counter resets as it starts over at zero after 9,999 photos. Personally, it should be like the old Volvo odometers that had the hundred thousand digit active (very cool).

While my brain tells me that the full-sized sensor camera and larger glass would result in better overall picture quality, the truth is that I am happy with the results of the smaller, lighter camera setup and the picture quality.

As every photo I post has gone through a Photoshop Elements post-processing, the pictures get a fairly complete examination at 100% viewing to look for dead pixels and problem areas. Yes, there is some color fringing and banding when shooting close to the sun. I can live with it. And in really low light, many of the pixels will go to a red, white or black) The 14 MP is more than adequate for cropping to leave a suitably large photo.

So....can't tell you if Nikon or Canon is better. But the Nikon 5000 has been a trooper, and even fallen out of an unzipped camera bag, falling about 2 feet into the beach sand of Huntington Beach with no problems to the zoom.

When I'm rich, there will be a full-size sensor camera in the bag. Until then, this camera is still going strong and the stock lenses are fine for the hobby in my life.  Smiley
« Last Edit: August 19, 2011, 02:36 AM by chilese » Logged

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Allen Carter
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« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2011, 07:14 AM »

Having watched your progress in kite photography from the beginning, I'd say the camera has little to do with your success. It's all about the cross-field yell technique. You are a natural.    Wink

But seriously, while megapixels and other stats have improved, looking at the last Kite Party shots I tend to think the responsiveness of the camera and clarity of the SLR viewfinder has been the big benefit.

A nice DSLR is a joy to use.

Recently I've been fortunate to have access to a Nikon D7000 for a project I'm working on. First DSLR I've done serious work with. Excellent. The 18-105 lens is really good. Some distortion at each end of it's range, but very sharp. I have a bag full of fairly special old Nikkor fixed lenses that work great on this body. 24mm f2.0, 50mm f1.4, 180mm f2.8, etc. This special glass is the main reason I'd like a full frame camera, but it's hard to justify the cost.
« Last Edit: August 19, 2011, 07:22 AM by Allen Carter » Logged

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« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2011, 05:51 AM »

I bought a Nikon 3000 last summer and I love the camera. My only isue is that I have a set of A1 lens lying around (28mm-50mm-105mm-70-210mm) and I would like to use them so a 7000 is going to be the next one (beside the daughter wants the 3000 realy bad). I was looking at them on line and the are cheaper with a zoom lens than just the body alone...Go figure!!!. By the time I put the money together anyway the price will drop or a replacement will come out. This month I am switching the heating system of the house from oil to electricity so there goes the (little) saving I had Sad
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« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2011, 09:04 AM »


I hate using the LCD screen for composing shots.

I heartily agree, especially for outside photography.  I have a Canon PowerShot S3is with a fold-out LCD screen.  In the 5 years I've had the camera, I think I've used the LCD screen to compose my shot just a handful of times.
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« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2011, 02:24 PM »


I hate using the LCD screen for composing shots.

I heartily agree, especially for outside photography.  I have a Canon PowerShot S3is with a fold-out LCD screen.  In the 5 years I've had the camera, I think I've used the LCD screen to compose my shot just a handful of times.

+1

My main camera is an SX10is, and I had the S5is previously. Really nice screen, but it's normally folded away. I did use it once recently to hold the camera over a fence.
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« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2011, 08:55 AM »

Big agree on the lack of a viewfinder. Besides screen washout from reflected light you just cannot hold a camera steady at arms length or even partial length. I do use the screen on my Canon IS though, the swivel feature keeps me from having to lay on my belly when the angle I want happens to be from ground level.

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« Reply #6 on: August 27, 2011, 01:09 PM »

While my brain tells me that the full-sized sensor camera and larger glass would result in better overall picture quality, the truth is that I am happy with the results of the smaller, lighter camera setup and the picture quality.

As every photo I post has gone through a Photoshop Elements post-processing, the pictures get a fairly complete examination at 100% viewing to look for dead pixels and problem areas. Yes, there is some color fringing and banding when shooting close to the sun. I can live with it. And in really low light, many of the pixels will go to a red, white or black) The 14 MP is more than adequate for cropping to leave a suitably large photo.

Full-sized sensors are cool, but to my way of thinking, money is far better spent on really good lenses. Glass makes a world of difference. Fringing is largely a by-product of glass quality, but in the grand scheme of things, depending on what you're using your images for, it just doesn't matter that much. If fringing actually shows up in a hardcopy print, you have FRINGING. If it only shows up when you look at an image at 100%, then pfffft. That little bit of fringing doesn't show up much in a shot cropped for the web and there are many things you can do to edit it out. People have even written macros to do the job quickly/routinely, for Photoshop, Elements, and other programs.

As for seeing dead pixels, no worries. Film photographers routinely have to spot a print using grayscale inks, so it isn't a big deal to think about spotting (painting out) any dead pixels in your imaging program..... IF these dead pixels even show up in a cropped image for the web or hardcopy print. Most don't.

Nancy

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« Reply #7 on: October 19, 2011, 10:03 PM »

I have a D5000 and interested in purchasing a zoom lens. Anyway I went to a camera store today and was going to consider getting the 55-200 Nikon lens. The guy at the store told me I should get a SIGMA 70-300 lens It has a macro setting built in. He also said that the sigma has a metal connector in back of the lens where the NIKON has plastic. The lens he showed me was not VR and he said I do not really need it. What do you guys think?
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Allen Carter
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« Reply #8 on: October 19, 2011, 11:01 PM »

VR is a must have on a long lens. 

The camera store makes more money on the sigma, so they will talk it up

A cheap metal mount is no better than a good plastic one. There are a lot of other parts to a zoom lens that are more suceptable to damage than the mount  If you are using the camera daily, with lots of lens changes you'll wear out a cheap lens in a couple of years. If you shoot more casually, a cheap lens can last forever.
« Last Edit: October 19, 2011, 11:03 PM by Allen Carter » Logged

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« Reply #9 on: October 20, 2011, 01:42 AM »

I had that lens for a couple of years and loved it. Huge range and it worked great as a walk-about lens. It *loves* color. If you have decent light, you'll get some really really nice imagery. When you've saved enough money for a really good lens, you'll have enough experience by then to tell the difference. Even then, it's fun to have in the bag for those days you just want to take one lens. Camera shake wasn't a problem with this lens-- it's a short lens, lightweight, and in good light it's fast enough. In low light it's not horrible (lol), but you'll want to make sure you're well braced for a longer exposure.

For what it's worth, a great place to buy is B&H Photo Video in New York City. Their prices are competitive and often cheaper. They are really honest/straight-forward to deal with, too. Even if you don't buy from them their website is well worth a looksee if for no other reason than there is a ton of information to be had. They also have incredible hardcopy catalogs you can order. Be aware that they close down the online ordering stuff for Jewish observances. I never found it to be a problem.
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?Ntt=70mm+300mm+sigma&N=0&InitialSearch=yes

Another place to shop around for lenses and even cameras is Fred Miranda's website. They do a good job of policing themselves so that you know you can buy from people there with a good deal of confidence:
http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/board/10

Have fun!

Nancy
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« Reply #10 on: October 20, 2011, 07:08 AM »

+1 for B&H,

 I have purchased many items (not all photo) from them. The only complaint I have is once when in NY City I walked about a mile and a half to thier store from our hotel, only to find them closed for inventory...bummer
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« Reply #11 on: October 20, 2011, 07:08 AM »


For what it's worth, a great place to buy is B&H Photo Video in New York City. Their prices are competitive and often cheaper. They are really honest/straight-forward to deal with, too. Even if you don't buy from them their website is well worth a looksee if for no other reason than there is a ton of information to be had. They also have incredible hardcopy catalogs you can order. Be aware that they close down the online ordering stuff for Jewish observances. I never found it to be a problem.......
Have fun!

Nancy


I have the good fortune to be traveling to Denver and NYC next week to visit two of my kids.
While in NYC, my first time ever, I have B&H at the very top of my "must see" list!
When you are that close to "Camera Mecca", you must make the pilgrimage!
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« Reply #12 on: October 20, 2011, 07:48 AM »

When palnning a visit to B&H  note they are more than Jewish ,they are 9th degree black belt Jews. They close for all Jewish holidays not just the major ones and the Sabbath begins Friday at sunset and goes through Saturday. They have a great staff and it's fantastic to see all the product. I love a stroll through the vintage area.
Rob
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« Reply #13 on: October 20, 2011, 08:07 AM »

When palnning a visit to B&H  note they are more than Jewish ,they are 9th degree black belt Jews. They close for all Jewish holidays not just the major ones and the Sabbath begins Friday at sunset and goes through Saturday. They have a great staff and it's fantastic to see all the product. I love a stroll through the vintage area.
Rob

Yep, they are definitely men who know what they believe, and live accordingly. It is actually refreshing to see in this day and age.

I plan on spending an unrestricted amount of time there, early in the week.   Wink
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« Reply #14 on: October 20, 2011, 11:39 AM »

Quote
Yep, they are definitely men who know what they believe, and live accordingly. It is actually refreshing to see in this day and age.

I plan on spending an unrestricted amount of time there, early in the week.   Wink

Yup, they are the real deal-- would that more of us could live by our convictions. In any case, you lucky dawg! It would be so cool to actually go there. Have fun!

Nancy
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