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Author Topic: Bridle Making  (Read 2399 times)
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Stuart99
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« on: September 13, 2011, 05:06 PM »

I have my Invictus sail all finished and framed up, and it's time to get down to adding a bridle (the part I'm least confident about). Are there any good tutorials out there that include bridle making? You guys have any tips that will prevent me from pulling my hair out? Any help is appreciated.

Thanks,
Stuart

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AKA_MrBill
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« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2011, 05:15 PM »

Here is a link to an excellent site. This link goes to the section on bridles. Wardley did an awesome job of explaining much of the theory and practice of bridle making.

http://wardley.org/kites/bridle/index.html
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sugarbaker
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« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2011, 05:55 PM »

I haven't gotten to bridle making in my B'zar build thread (a few posts below this one on the forum), but one thing I would suggest is to make a board with all the measurements marked on it for each leg after it has been tied.  compare your tied bridle legs to the board to ensure symmetry between the two halves.  The other thing I suggest is to consider sewing your bridle loops instead of knotting them... I find it easier to calculate exact lengths this way, as I can just wrap the bridle line around some nails I put in my board and then sew them without worrying about the length lost due to the knots.  (keep in mind that you will still have to calculate the loss of the loops when they are formed into a larks head or prussic knot.

It will probably be a few weeks before I get to documentation on bridles, but I will be posting pictures of how I make my own bridles in the B'zar thread... if you get your bridle done before I post my documentation, you should feel free to contribute any hints you have learned through your own build.
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KaoS
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« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2011, 06:45 PM »

The kite looks NICE!
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Kevin Sanders

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« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2011, 06:47 PM »

Looks good! Any chance I'll get to fly it someday?  Wink

For a one-off static bridle, I find it easiest to measure it on the kite with adjustments at all connection points.

Make the ULE connection point with adjustment knots. This is just a piece of line with a overhand in one end, a distance to allow for the knot used, and then 5 or so overhand knots spaced at 1 or 1.5 cm apart.

I use a slip knot to attach the line to the spar above the fitting and leave 110 mm from the end stopper knot to the first adjustment knot.

The other two attachment points can be made from 30 cm sections of line simply tied in a loop with an overhand. These get larksheaded onto the spars.

Make the uphaul and outhaul out of one piece of line, a bit longer than the final length of the two lines added together. Tie a loop in the end that will connect to the ULE and larkshead that onto the middle adjustment knot. Cut the inhaul a bit longer than the required inhaul length. Tie it to the uphaul/outhaul line with a double larkshead - this can be formed either with a loop or preferably with an overhand in the end with the uphaul/outhaul line double larksheaded around it and pushed to the stopper knot. Adjust it so you have the proper uphaul length. Now tie the outhaul to the LLE connection point with a double sheet bend.

Make up the leadouts long enough so they will have about 6" extra beyond the TE in a wrapped turtle. This will prevent excessive wear. If it's a turbo bridle, attach to the inhaul using the same method used to attach the inhaul to the uphaul/outhaul. Adjust it for the turbo leg measurement. If it's a 3 point bridle, just larkshead it over the knot for the uphaul/outhaul line. Once the leadout's affixed, measure the inhaul and secure with a double sheetbend.

If the inhaul is slack enough that it will likely catch on the tail, attach a line from about the middle of it to somewhere on the uphaul - I generally put a sheetbend in the uphaul loop. Make sure it's just slack enough that the bridle has full range of motion without the straightness of the inhaul being affected.

At any rate that's one method. There are other ways that look better, but this allows for adjustments and is pretty easy to do.
As with just about everything in kites, there's no one right way   Grin
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ainokea
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« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2011, 08:03 PM »

I haven't gotten to bridle making in my B'zar build thread (a few posts below this one on the forum), but one thing I would suggest is to make a board with all the measurements marked on it for each leg after it has been tied.  compare your tied bridle legs to the board to ensure symmetry between the two halves.  The other thing I suggest is to consider sewing your bridle loops instead of knotting them... I find it easier to calculate exact lengths this way, as I can just wrap the bridle line around some nails I put in my board and then sew them without worrying about the length lost due to the knots.  (keep in mind that you will still have to calculate the loss of the loops when they are formed into a larks head or prussic knot.

It will probably be a few weeks before I get to documentation on bridles, but I will be posting pictures of how I make my own bridles in the B'zar thread... if you get your bridle done before I post my documentation, you should feel free to contribute any hints you have learned through your own build.

That's a +1 on making a jig for bridles. Both halves has to be even, and just measuring and "eyeballing" the different legs aren't going to cut it
if you want the kite to actually fly. In the beginning when I made bridles for my Hyperkites, and customer repairs, I would tie them together.
But as time went on, and got much better at making bridles, I learned how to make knotless loops and would do them that way for my kites. (customers kites would still be tied, still works right?) It looked much cleaner and more professional than knots do. Attention to detail on my kites was, and still is a big thing for me. Take a look at a tied bridle, a sewn one, and one that is knotless. (if you can find a kite with one) Which one looks cleaner and better to you?
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Allen Carter
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« Reply #6 on: September 13, 2011, 08:08 PM »

As far as construction goes, I'd look at some well made kites and mimic the constuction you like. Some bridles make sense to me and some are hard to figure out. If you have a kite where you've noticed the bridle being particularly clean, easy to adjust, robust, whatever, mimc the construction with your own specs/design.

A bridle board as mentioned and referenced in Wardly is a great cheap tool. Especially in making sure both halves of everything are exactly the same.
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Allen, AKA kitehead
Allen Carter
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« Reply #7 on: September 13, 2011, 08:09 PM »

Great minds think alike....
 Cheesy

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Allen, AKA kitehead
dihongshao2000
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« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2011, 12:18 AM »

Really nice looking kite especially the color combination and layout...beautiful job!
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Hadge
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« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2011, 12:33 AM »

You might find this useful.

http://www.ian.ourshack.org/kitedesign/bridling.html

Nice looking kite by the way!
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coogee
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« Reply #10 on: September 14, 2011, 12:36 AM »

That kite looks great!!!
 Mike
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HiFly
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« Reply #11 on: September 14, 2011, 05:04 AM »

Hi Scott,

make it as adjustable as possible.
I didn't like the original turbo at all and I'm now using a (shorter) 3 Point. Still trying to get the best setup, that fits my style of flying, but I'm pretty close. I also removed nearly all of the extra tail weight and my STD Invictus still pitches very well.
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Mike
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« Reply #12 on: September 14, 2011, 07:51 AM »

I like Ken McNiells method of attaching the bridle to the leading edges.

Cow Hitch


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Gardner
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« Reply #13 on: September 14, 2011, 10:02 AM »

One of the secrets of bridle-making is patience.  When working on a new bridle for a kite, I've sometimes spent an hour or more experimenting with different setting and nothing worked.  The next day when I started over, my first attempt was right-on.

As a starting point, the in-haul and out-haul legs generally parallel the lower spreader while the up-haul is perpendicular to the lower spreader.  The in-haul usually is attached to the one-piece out-haul/up-haul about and inch or less below the spreader on a 3-point bridle.

The tow points attach at the junction of the three lines.  When the assembled kite is picked up by the tow points, the spine should be almost level with the ground.

Also keep a record of the in-haul, out-haul and up-haul measurement tried.  Sometimes an eight of an inch   makes a world of difference.
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inewham
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« Reply #14 on: September 14, 2011, 10:12 AM »

I like Ken McNiells method of attaching the bridle to the leading edges.

Me too.

Like many kitemakers I used running knots with a stopper however they can be a pain to loosen if you need to retie a worn leg in the field. A cow hitch like Ken uses is much simpler to loosen/retie.

Don't be too neurotic about getting everything perfect. Unless the bridle is very short they're usually tolerant of moderate errors (if your bridle is so short that small errors do make a difference you'll have a pretty skittish kite and will benefit from lengthening it a bit)

If this is your first bridle, use some heavy dacron. Its really easy to work with, knots well, its easy to mark with a pen and on such short lengths the extras stretch over spectra/dyneema cored bridle cord is negligable.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2011, 10:15 AM by inewham » Logged

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