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Author Topic: 3-Point Bridle vrs. Turbo vrs. Reverse Turbo  (Read 645 times)
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photogbill
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« on: July 05, 2015, 01:19 PM »

I've been doing a little fine tuning of my latest build (the Valor) and debating which style bridle would give me my best desired results. Can any of you builders or others give me your opinions ...or the general opinion of the different flight characteristics of each of the three more common bridle types from the subject line ....Both Pros & Cons of each?

Also, I think I know the difference between a turbo & a reverse-turbo bridle but perhaps someone could clarify the differences between the two!

This is probably an easy question for some ...but not me! In the past a 3-point bridle has served me well but looking for 'the best' for my latest kite creation!

Thanks! 
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chilese
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« Reply #1 on: July 05, 2015, 01:59 PM »

While not a builder, I did have my first elastic auto-bridle chuckled at by Mark Reed in 2001.  Roll Eyes

To me the static bridle is similar in concept to a one-speed "fixie" bicycle (did I get that correct).

Immediate response, but least forgiving.

The turbo bridles are a bit like an automatic transmission; more forgiving and slightly mushy in response.

Several kites have had bridles that can be converted between turbo and 3-point by

sliding the inhaul along an extended tow section.

Don't forget the Tristar Active Bridle by Andy Wardley which can be used in conjuction with a a turbo.

https://picasaweb.google.com/chilesej/2004Kites#5432449363781915954
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John Chilese: Las Vegas, NV
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Allen Carter
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« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2015, 09:25 PM »

While I'm not a kite builder, I have tried a lot of bridles on a lot of kites and I think it's safe to say the only way to know what type of bridle you will like best on a given kite is to give it a try.

It's really easy to put two bridles on a kite at the same time and switch between them quickly for A/B testing.
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Allen, AKA kitehead
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« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2015, 10:46 PM »

Andy Wardley describes the mechanics and benefits of dynamic bridles extremely well.  His descriptions apply to both Turbo and Reverse Turbo.

The difference between the two types of turbo are the direction the tow point moves when tension is applied to that side of the kite.  In forward flight, in the case of a standard turbo, the tow point moves down and away from the centre of the kite.  With a reverse turbo, it moves down and towards the centre of the kite.

Moving down - this effectively increases the length of the uphaul, leading to greater sail pressure and tighter turning.
Moving away from the centre of the kite - in general, this reduces the kite's tendency to track straight, increasing its tendency to turn.
Moving toward the centre of the kite - in general, this increases the kite's tendency to track straight, decreasing its tendency to turn.

In non-forward flight (i.e. tricks) the tow point behaves quite differently depending on the orientation of the kite, weight distribution, sail billow, etc.. 

For example, in the fade position the length of the uphaul is no longer a factor.  However, the distance of the tow point from the spine has a marked effect.  The tow point on a reverse turbo will be further away from the spine than on a standard turbo.  In the fade, close together tow points force the flying lines to cross the leading edge towards the nose.  This applies downward pressure on the nose and can lead to the kite tending to fall out of the fade.  The wider apart tow points on a reverse turbo allow the flying lines to cross the leading edges away from the nose, closer to the wingtips.  This affects the height of the nose much less and can lead to a more stable fade. (However, a kite with a lot of tail weight might not easily come out of a fade when fitted with a reverse turbo)

The wider tow points in a reverse turbo make initiating a back spin easier (it's easier to spin a bike wheel if you apply pressure at the rim rather than next to the hub).

There are so many different ways a kite is oriented in various tricks it isn't easy to summarize all the effects various bridle configurations have.  When other factors come into it (sail shape, winglets or not, weight distribution, etc.) it becomes almost impossible.

P.S. There is also the turbo bridle where the towpoint is on the upper leg.  Very effective, but different again  Grin

*Edited to correct spelling mistake

« Last Edit: July 14, 2015, 05:10 PM by KaoS » Logged

Kevin Sanders

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Re:
« Reply #4 on: July 14, 2015, 12:47 PM »

Great explanation, Kevin
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Allen Carter
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« Reply #5 on: July 14, 2015, 08:48 PM »



There are so many different ways a kite is oriented in various tricks it isn't easy to summarize all the effects various bridle configurations have.  When other factors come into it (sail shape, winglets or not, weight distribution, etc.) it becomes almost impossible.



Yes, a very good explanation, but when it comes right down to it...

Ya gotta just try various bridles and see what works for you and the specific kite.

It has as much to do with the flyer as the kite in many cases. The Gemini has had the benefit of probably the most sophisticated bridle development of any kite I know and yet many people still prefer the original bridle from way back in 1999. Go figure.
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Allen, AKA kitehead
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