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Author Topic: Kite Line  (Read 4060 times)
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glen871
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« on: June 29, 2012, 06:23 PM »

Can I use 90 lb kite line where 100 lb line is recommended or should I just go ahead and order the 100 lb string?   It's for an 8 ft Delta Conyne. 
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Tmadz
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« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2012, 06:29 PM »

It depends on the wind you're flying in. If youre flying in the lower wind range it should be ok.
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kiteking
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« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2012, 06:51 PM »

If youre flying in the lower wind range it should.  Be ok

I agree, but you need to ask yourself which costs more the line or the kite

If you have a variety of kites, then when purchasing new line you might want to jump up to 150# of even 200, again depending on the kite(s) or the wind in your area, a hard pulling kite need heaver line than a easy flyer
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Lee S
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« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2012, 06:58 PM »

+1 on what Mike said. For an 8 ft DC, I'd go 150# or more, especially if you like flying high. The kite can lift the line, and I prefer to go too heavy if I have a choice.

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glen871
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« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2012, 07:10 PM »

Good points.  Where I fly the winds do get gusty so I should probably go up to 150.   I also like to fly high.  I suppose the 150 lb line will come in handy if I want to get a slightly larger kite as well.  Thanks for all the replies. 
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mikenchico
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« Reply #5 on: June 29, 2012, 07:34 PM »

150 is my go to line in all but the lightest conditions or a small kite. It's a nice size for hand holding either with or without gloves, smaller line hurts or is hard to get a secure grip on with gloves.


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boomertype
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« Reply #6 on: June 29, 2012, 10:32 PM »

Line test strength is an average for the specific line. Made and placed on huge spools, the line is tested in design phase and then the average "weight" in "breaking" strength is listed. Your specific line may be 10 lbs plus or minus the listed weight (or more). One companies 90 lb  line may be another's 110. That said, I was fly "heavy", I use 150 and 250 most of the time. My Ichian always sits on 250 lb line. Smaller kites I'll move down to 150. I carry some 110 for light air and thats as low as I go, except for some 90 lb line that looks exactly like my 110.
An 8 ft Conyne, 150 for sure.  Wink
« Last Edit: June 30, 2012, 06:52 AM by boomertype » Logged
Steve Hall
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« Reply #7 on: June 29, 2012, 10:50 PM »

I have always said 'line is cheap insurance',  I tend to fly with line a bit heavier than recommended.  The added strength is a good idea and as Mike pointed out it is also easier to handle.
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Tmadz
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« Reply #8 on: June 30, 2012, 05:50 AM »

He was asking if it was ok to use. On occasion I have used lighter line, but only in the lower wind speeds. I do tend to go safety conscious and buy heavier line than I need. I over engineer everything I DIY. If I don't have the proper line handy, but had something that was close I used it and kept a watchful eye.

Yes line is cheap insurance, especially for a puller like a conyne.
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