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Author Topic: Doug Stout's Arrow Canard build (split off from the Stunt kite design tool)  (Read 35938 times)
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Doug S
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« Reply #210 on: June 22, 2014, 09:39 AM »

Decided to take my entire Bird of Prey (BOP) single line glider kite family outside for a group picture.  Cheesy

•  Front Row:  Original BOP 24 made with black PC31.

•  Second Row:  Ultra-light BOP 24s made with white Cuben.

•  Third Row:   Ultra-light BOP 24s made with orange Cuben and CST DPP Carbon frames (Hollow and Solid).

•  Four Row:  Ultra-light BOP 48 made with orange Cuben and ultra-light BOP 36 made with white Cuben.

•  Rear and standing:  BOP 62 and BOP 48 in the fighter pattern layout, and BOP 48 in the bird pattern layout.

Link to higher resolution picture:  https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_TPx1W-lkmSWFd0MDBwb0F5a1U/edit?usp=sharing

Later,

Doug

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« Reply #211 on: June 25, 2014, 06:46 AM »

One our fellow kite building enthusiasts asked how to print the Bird of Prey 48 plans to smaller paper.  I found the following link that allowed me to print to letter or A4 size paper.

http://helpx.adobe.com/acrobat/kb/print-posters-banners-acrobat-reader.html

The key settings that I used are as followings:

  •  Tile Scale:  Leave this at 100%, otherwise you will change the size of the kite.
  •  Overlap:  I set this to 0.5 inches, since the printer cannot print to the edge of the paper.
  •  Cut marks:  Check the box, since these marks will help you align the pages.
  •  Labels:  Check the box
  •  Tile only large pages:  Check the box

The actual Bird of Prey 48 plans are full size and setup to print to a large printer, which uses a roll of 30 inch wide paper.  I am aware that other kite building enthusiast print out their full size plans at Kinkos.

Later,

Doug
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Doug S
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« Reply #212 on: July 13, 2014, 09:41 AM »

Building a few Birds of Prey (BOP) for others.  The attached picture is a BOP 36 on its way to the west coast.  Grin

Later,

Doug

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Doug S
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« Reply #213 on: July 13, 2014, 09:48 AM »

Kurtis Jones posted the following fun fly on Facebook, which I hope to attend:

Flash Fly - " Its a Great Day to Fly Kites "

A unofficial kite event, no sponsors, no sound, no registration, no boundaries, no competition, no pressure, no money needed.

Come with any kind of kite and any kind of people.  Make a kite, dig out that old dusty kite from the attic, buy a new kite, borrow a kite (OPK), share a kite, whatever.  Just get your hands on a kite.

This is an unofficial event.  You are responsible for everything including having a good time.

When:  July 19, 1pm
Rain Date:  July 20, 1pm
Location:
  The New Overpeck Park
  Fort Lee Road
  Leonia, New Jersey
  https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8571465,-74.0089872,19z
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« Reply #214 on: July 15, 2014, 09:34 AM »

I am trying to finish a very nice Bird of Prey (BOP) 48 for a local kite flyer, but my Singer 645 is acting up again.  The test zigzag stitching on scraps of PC31 showed the lower part of the stitch was loose, but not at every stitch, which is very strange.  It doesn't do this when I sew straight stitches.  Tried to adjust the lower tension at the bobbin, but that didn't make a difference.  Now the thread is getting caught around the bobbin case.  It appears the original position bracket is not holding the bobbin case in place.  Ordered some replacement parts and the service manual from Sewing Parts Online.  Will also service the top tension system and try a different bobbin.  It was a late night with no foward progress.  Are we having fun yet?  Roll Eyes

The good news is that the BOP 48 will not be touched by this Singer 645 until this problem is fixed.   Smiley 

Later,

Doug
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stapp59
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« Reply #215 on: July 15, 2014, 10:49 AM »

I had some weirdness with my Pfaff for a while: dropped stitches, occasional jams, tension issues.  Very annoying. Took off the foot plate and covers around the hook area and found loose thread pieces and such that needed cleaned out.  Much better now.  Hope you find whatever it is...
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Doug S
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« Reply #216 on: July 16, 2014, 07:58 AM »

Thanks Steve.  The Singer 645 had very little use before I acquired it from a family member, which may be part of the problem.  Other than being an older machine, it’s like brand new regarding wear and tear.

No loose threads below the foot plate, other than the mess I made a couple of times when it jammed.  Opps  Embarrassed  For some unknown reason, the bobbin case seems to be binding a little in the rotating hook, but I didn’t see any burs in the guides.  I polished and oiled the guides and it appears to be better.  Waiting for a new position bracket that holds the bobbin case in the back, which was bent and I broke the tip off trying to straighten it.  Opps again.  Embarrassed  It was a chrome plated cast piece of steel, where the one in my Singer 604 is a stamped piece of steel.  The replacement is a stamped piece of steel.  I also will replace the bobbin tension spring arm, which appears a little weak because it's not allowing me to apply enough tension on the bobbin.

There is a great website to trouble shoot sewing machines at:  http://www.tandtrepair.com/index.html.  One of the articles indicates the upper tension system maybe where my problem is with this machine.  I took apart the upper tension section of the machine last night and saw a little residual film on the tension disks.  I cleaned them with alcohol, but they are still dull.  Tonight I will polish the tension disks.  The tension indicator knob is made of cast aluminum with a steel set screw.  After loosening the set screw, it took the aluminum treads with it.  Will tap out the hole and use a slightly larger set screw.  Also order the complete assembly just in case.  Most of the new parts are interchangeable between my Singer 604 and 645, which is why I am investing so much time to get the 645 working correctly.

Also ordered two new Teflon feet for my Singer 604 and 645 to give them a try.  Always wanted to be a sewing machine mechanic.  Cheesy  Are we having fun yet.  Wink

Later,

Doug
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stapp59
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« Reply #217 on: July 16, 2014, 06:44 PM »

Ugh on the machine problems.  Sad  I'd be tempted to find a good repair shop in your area and have them give it a good going over and test with some scraps of kite fabric.  Hard to build kites with an unreliable machine.  Cry

Unless you are having fun  Cheesy
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Doug S
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« Reply #218 on: July 17, 2014, 08:39 AM »

Steve,

My Plan B is to take the Singer 645 to a local shop that we trust.  Having three engineering degrees, and rebuilt a few car engines and the out drive on my power boat, the problem with the Singer 645 intrigues me, since it’s barely been used.  I am having fun, but if the new parts and a new setup following the service manual don’t work, it will go in the shop.  I have sewn many kites since the 1990s with the Singer 604, and other than minor adjustments and maintenance, it has worked perfectly.  That is why I am willing to put the time and money into the Singer 645, since it’s one of the upper models in the old 600 series line and built like a tank.

My disappointment is that I am trying to finish the Bird of Prey 48 for Art, who is a local kite flyer.  The attached picture is of his kite before I glued the panels together.  It has a white nose that you can't see when placed on the pattern layout drawing.  If needed, I will locate another quality sewing machine that can perform the multi-step zigzag stitch to finish those stitches on Art’s kite, then use the Singer 604 for the remaining straight stitches.  You are only as good as your tools.

Later,

Doug

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« Reply #219 on: August 03, 2014, 02:50 PM »

I made my first set of repairs and adjustments to the Singer 645, but found the real problem.  In the Singer 600 Series Touch & Sew, the early models had steel gears, such as in my 604.  After the initial low model numbers (60X), Singer changed to plastic gears.  In my Singer 645, the top vertical gear lost a few teeth.

Contacted Terry at http://www.tandtrepair.com/index.html and he help me out.  Since I am going to have to tear down the 645 to get to the broken gear, I might as well replace all of the key gears.  From Terry, I ordered a complete set of gears and his instructions on how to replace them and retime the sewing machine.  Unfortunately, I can only replace the plastic gears with an updated version of plastic gears.  Now I know why the call the Singer Touch & Sew series “Touch & Throw”. Cheesy

While in the service mode, I took apart my Singer 604 and polished the upper tension disks, and the lower bobbin case.  Re-setup the upper and lower tensions and bobbin case gaps using the Singer's Service Manual and Terry's free online guides.  Even replaced the stock steel presser foot with a Teflon presser foot.  Confirmed that the 604 has steel gears and applied a thin layer of grease.  Did the same service on the 645, until I found the broken gear.  With the 604, I ran a few stitch passes on a strip of PC-31 to redial in the tensions.  I really like how the Singer 604 does a straight stitch and that it has steel gears. Grin

While on hold to finish Art’s Bird of Prey (BOP) 48, I started tinkering with a larger version of the BOP.  I scaled up the design to use 40 inch one piece wing spars, which would cause the wing span to be 76 inches.  Since I like patriotic colors and the wing span includes two of the numbers in 1776, I got carried away and designed the attached layout.  Due to the resolution of Microsoft Paint, the attached layout doesn’t allow me to show what I will do with the eyes.  Each eye will have a black center with a yellow outer ring, and a gray tear drop area around each eye, like the eyes of a Bald Eagle.  Still tinkering with the layout.  Will need the Singer 645 working to sew this kite.  I also have a scale up version of my Fighter layout with two more panels, which I could build using my Singer 604.

Later,

Doug
« Last Edit: October 07, 2014, 07:47 AM by Doug S » Logged

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« Reply #220 on: August 03, 2014, 02:54 PM »

The attached layout is the larger version of the Bird of Prey in the original Drone layout, with two additional panels.  I do have the desire to design and build one with a wing span between 8 and 9 feet.  Wink

Later,

Doug
« Last Edit: August 03, 2014, 03:27 PM by Doug S » Logged

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« Reply #221 on: August 04, 2014, 05:26 AM »

Just to let you know that I didn't forget, I will be finishing up the plans for the ultra-light Bird of Prey (BOP) 24 and 36 in the near future and posting the plans on this website.  I have been a little distracted with sewing machine repairs and projects around my home.

As a reminder, the BOP 36 is my favorite for ultra-light gliding, and is a joy to fly to music.  The few BOP 36s that I have built for others fly like a dream.  I have a second BOP 36 on the building table for me.  The BOP 24 is a fun little ultra-light glider to play with in smaller areas or outside in light wind conditions.  I am in the process of building a BOP 24 for Steve as a gift for allowing me to share my designs on this great website.  Both of these BOPs keep me entertained for hours.

Regarding my development of a larger version, if anyone has a size in mind, please let me know.  With the new frame in the BOP 62, it fly’s very well, which is the reason I wish to experiment with a larger version.  When you design a kite, you work around existing frame lengths and stiffness, which is why the 76 is being considered due to 40 inch wing spars.  I also can obtain one piece hollow tube wing spars that are two meters in length.  As I go bigger, I need to fabricate the unique center joiner that allows the wing spars to go forward and upward.  Ultimately I would like to build one around the size of my other large conventional gliders, which have wing spans of 96 inches.  Once I get my Singer 645 back up and running, I can finish Art’s BOP 48 and then build a larger version.  If the larger version fly’s as expected, I would make the plans available on this website.

Also, if anyone is interested in the plans for the Fighter/Drone panel layout for the BOP-48 or BOP-62, just let me know.  This version is a lot more work to build due to the plan seams, but is sewn with all straight stitches.  This is my favorite construction technique.

Later,

Doug
« Last Edit: August 04, 2014, 05:29 AM by Doug S » Logged

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Doug S
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« Reply #222 on: August 06, 2014, 11:59 AM »

As indicated in my recent posts, I have the desire to build a larger version of the Bird of Prey (BOP).  With my engineering background, I am in the process of estimating various sizes of the Bird of Prey, based on the stiffness and lengths of available carbon tubes.

The following is a little technical regarding my efforts to date with small diameter pultruded carbon tubes (0.033 to 0.098 inch in diameter), so please read on if you are interested.  If anyone else has done the following, please let me know.

After performing some research, I calculated the Moment of Inertia (MI) for the various small diameter pultruded carbon tubes, where I have various sizes in my possession.  Using the manufactures’ reported Modulus of Elasticity (E) values, I calculated the anticipated deflection for each carbon tube at a given length.  When I compare the results to my deflection measurements, I observed my deflection measurements were slightly higher (more deflection) than my calculations.  In speaking with one of the carbon tube suppliers, the E values are what was provide to them by the manufacture and may represent the E of the raw material.  Based on this, it is my assumption that one should expect lower E values in each completed carbon tube.  By using my deflection measurements, I calculated the actual E value for each small diameter pultruded carbon tube in my possession.  My deflection measurements and associated calculations indicate the CST DPP pultruded carbon tubes are approximately 35% stiffer than then pultruded carbon tubes provided by other kite vendors.  Also, my calculations indicate the calculated E value for CST DPP pultruded carbon tubes is approximately 23% lower than the E value published by CST, which is not unexpected.

Now for the fun part, I also was looking for a simple mathematical relationship between the diameter of a carbon tube and the sail area of my BOPs.  I have experimented with various carbon tube frames in my four BOPs, with wing spans of 24, 36, 48 and 62 inches, as discussed in prior posts.  Using the selected carbon tube for each BOP, I was able to see a linear relationship with a very high correlation (R2 = 0.9993) between the sail area of each BOP and the associated cross sectional area of the selected carbon tube.  I also used the information for the frames that I no longer have in each BOP, and in most cases the results indicate that the frames did not have sufficient cross sectional area for the associated sail area of the BOP.  In the one case where the cross sectional area was greater for a BOP-48, the carbon tube was not durable and would split under load at the joiner.

With this information, I can now take the specifications for a manufacture’s specific pultruded carbon tube and estimate the appropriate sail area for a larger BOP.  Since each BOP has the same shape, the relationship between the sail area and wing span is a constant, which also allows me to estimate the associated wing span for each carbon tube.  The work indicated above and in the attached chart are my efforts to this point in time.

Later,

Doug
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Doug S
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« Reply #223 on: August 10, 2014, 11:51 AM »

I received the replacement gears for the Singer 645 on Friday.  Since I would have to take the machine apart to replace the one broken gear, I also would replace the lower four gears just in case.  The repairs only took me a few hours, which included resetting up the machine using the factory service manual.  Works like brand new!  Still will use the Singer 604 for straight stitching, since it has the steel gears.

Now I can finish Art's Bird of Prey 48!

Update:  With the Singer 645, I now fit the definition of “Insanity” by Albert Einstein in “doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.”  After replacing the gears and resetting up the machine, I tried to do a 3-step zigzag stitch on a scrap of PC31, and broke a tooth off the top vertical gear again.  In replacing the gears, I repaired the damage, but did not fix what was causing the damage.  Thinking ahead, I purchased the replacement gears with the 45-day warranty and I am now getting a new gear free.  Terry also sent me very detail instructions on how to trouble shoot my problem, which we believe is in the upper and cam area of the Singer 645.  With this down time, I was able to finish and post the plans for the Bird of Prey 24 and 36.  Enjoy!

Later,

Doug
« Last Edit: August 21, 2014, 08:22 PM by Doug S » Logged

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Doug S
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« Reply #224 on: August 19, 2014, 04:06 PM »

Dear Fellow Glider Kite Enthusiasts,

If you have been following my development of the Bird of Prey swept forward wing glider kites, you will know that I am pleased with the design for the ultra-light and low wind versions of this kite.  In the spirit of sharing the joy of this design with other glider kite enthusiasts, the following provides my modest requests and the links to my Bird of Prey 24 made with Cuben Fabric.

Requests:

•   When you download the plans, please provide a financial contribution to this great kite forum.

•   When you complete your Bird of Prey 24, please post a picture or video of your kite on this great kite forum.

•   There is a note on the plans that indicates the plans are not being offered for someone to build and sell the kite to others for a profit.

Links to Plans:

•   Bird of Prey 24 – Specifications Plan (Updated November 12, 2014):  https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_TPx1W-lkmSYWk3Vk03eDhWbTg/view?usp=sharing

•   Bird of Prey 24 – Pattern for Cuben Fabric Plan (Updated November 12, 2014):  https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_TPx1W-lkmSQ0xwTFU2MlljMms/view?usp=sharing

Links to Pictures:

•   Bird of Prey 24 – Nose and Nose Weight Picture:  https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_TPx1W-lkmSTk4yN1BQbEtXVzA/edit?usp=sharing

•   Bird of Prey 24 – Center Joiner Picture:  https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_TPx1W-lkmSTzBReF9teDd3RlE/edit?usp=sharing

•   Bird of Prey 24 – Right Tip and Batten Picture:  https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_TPx1W-lkmSQXVNZVZTbE1DaGs/edit?usp=sharing

•   Bird of Prey 24 – Tail Picture:  https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_TPx1W-lkmSQXFMb0drczhFaUk/edit?usp=sharing

Yours in kiting,

Doug
« Last Edit: November 14, 2014, 12:38 PM by Doug S » Logged

"We never really grow up, we only learn how to act in public."
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