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Author Topic: Doug Stout's Arrow Canard build (split off from the Stunt kite design tool)  (Read 33555 times)
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Doug S
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« Reply #75 on: May 24, 2013, 04:46 PM »

Thief,

I am glad to hear the Hawk arrived.  Regarding trimming, adjust the line along the center spine so the rear mark is just touching the rear portion of the center spin.  This will flatten the sail and make the Hawk float more, but it will be very sensitive to side line drag.  If you pull this center line so the front mark touches the center spine, the sail will have more of a curve, the glide will be more stable, but it will glide much faster.

Fly the Hawk using very light Spectra, since line drag has a lot of impact on this little 1.0 gram kite, and will pull the nose down.  I use 5 to 10 lb. spectra.  Also due to its small size, you need to use a very light touch on the line.  Aggressive line inputs make the kite zoom like a fighter kite.  To launch, just hold the tail between your fingers and toss it gently like a paper airplane.  I balanced the kite so that it would glide very easily with no line tension.  If you want more of a stall in the glide, just remove the center spine out of the end cap at the nose and trim the end cap back an 1/8 in.  You can also fly it outside in winds up to 5 mph with no problems.  This is a strong little kite that can take a beating.

Enjoy,

Doug
« Last Edit: July 10, 2013, 12:35 PM by Doug S » Logged

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« Reply #76 on: May 25, 2013, 08:14 AM »

Hey Doug:
I am going to put some more time on the Hawk today...got some young family members who were looking to fly kites but since it is raining........the indoor kites come out....so....that means i get more time to fly too!

it is a stout little one! Love it!!!!!
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Doug S
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« Reply #77 on: May 30, 2013, 11:42 AM »

Thief,

Let me know how your trimming efforts turn out.

Doug
« Last Edit: July 10, 2013, 12:35 PM by Doug S » Logged

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Doug S
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« Reply #78 on: May 30, 2013, 12:15 PM »

For those who are interested, I am experimenting with a novel concept.  A canard stunt kite.  Since I like the shape of the Rapere, I used my Geokite program to alter the 3D shape of the two sails to provide the typical stunt kite sail cut, with an angled depth from the nose to the trailing edge on each side of the center spine.  As a starting point, the angled sail depth will be 20 degrees.  The prototype will have a wing span of 48 inches and an overall height of 48 inches.  The upper and lower sails will be on the same plane along the center spine and each angled sail depth.  Drafting the kite in AutoCAD using the 3D features was interesting.  The sail material paper templates are done.  Will have fun figuring out how to frame this unique kite.

This kite is on hold at this time.

Doug
« Last Edit: June 30, 2013, 07:23 PM by Doug S » Logged

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« Reply #79 on: May 30, 2013, 02:50 PM »

Great idea, I think it could be a winner for a speed kite.
   Mike
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Doug S
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« Reply #80 on: June 02, 2013, 01:13 PM »

Next weekend in our American Cancer Society's Relay for Life event at Mt. Olive High School, in New Jersey.  My wife is a 6 year breast cancer survivor.  I am in the process of making a Rapere for the event in the Relay for Life colors:  purple, blue and red.  Hope to have it done in time.

A couple years ago I made one of my Eagles for the event, which you can see in the attached picture.  The pink ribbon is an appliqué.  The weather was just right last year, where I flew this Eagle in the middle of the night above the walking track.

Doug

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« Last Edit: July 10, 2013, 12:36 PM by Doug S » Logged

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« Reply #81 on: June 10, 2013, 05:54 AM »

Attended the American Cancer Society's Relay for Life event at Mt. Olive High School in New Jersey on Saturday, June 8, 2013.  The event was held inside due to the weather.  The main area was in the gym, with other activities in the lobby.  The following picture is part of my family’s team area in the lobby with two of my Relay for Life kites.  My family has been actively involved in this event for six years, since my wife’s diagnosis, surgery and recovery from breast cancer.  I did finish a 6 Panel Rapere in the Relay for Life colors of purple, blue and red.  There are white 1/8 in. pin stripes between the panels to break up the colors.  With the applique and pin stripes, the Rapere weights 49.3 grams.  The kite is actually very eye-catching in the day light and was a big hit with the event staff.  I will take a better picture and post it when the weather behaves in the northeast.

I brought along an iFlite that I flew for several hours in the lobby of the High School.  The kite was a huge hit with the attending children and parents.  I even taught several children how to fly the iFlite.  Due to the low ceiling in the lobby and the packed gym, I could not fly any of the Raperes indoors.  Did have a few of the children toss the Rapere in the picture like a paper airplane, which was quite entertaining to them and the attending parents.  Still working on trimming my 12 in. Hawk indoor kite.  Changed the center spine from a 0.03 in. to 0.02 in. carbon rod and induced a little bow in the spine.

In closing, if you are aware of a Relay for Life event in your area, by all means, please sign-up for a team, attend and contribute your time.  It’s a pleasure to share the joy of kiting to this great group of people.

Doug


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« Last Edit: July 10, 2013, 12:37 PM by Doug S » Logged

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Doug S
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« Reply #82 on: June 16, 2013, 10:20 AM »

Happy Fathers Day!

Made a few minor adjustments to the Cuben Hawk.  Trimmed 1/8 in. from the nose cap and changed the center spine from 0.03 in. to 0:02 in. carbon did the trick.

Just receive more 0.33 Cuben.  I have two new ultra light projects to start.  Will post pictures in the future.

Later,

Doug
« Last Edit: July 10, 2013, 12:37 PM by Doug S » Logged

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« Reply #83 on: June 22, 2013, 03:15 PM »

Well Doug... after weeks of forgetting to pack it in my kite bag, I finally remembered to bring the Rapere on an outing.  What a blast!  It took me a good 30 minutes or so to dial in the adjustments on the bridle, but once it was in the sweet spot I couldn't stop flying this awesome kite.  I saw no less than a dozen people trying to fly their SLKs without success.  One guy even said "if that guy can do it, we have to be able to get this thing to fly" (comparing my excellent Rapere to his plastic convenient store eddy... at least they were out trying).  Anyway, for my first glider style kite I can't say how pleased I am.  I think I'll make a second one with the slightly heavier frame (I noticed when the wind picked up to around 2mph the Rapere that I have pulse some... I think I could fly in slightly wider wind range with the heavier frame. 

Here's a pic I snapped with my phone:

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« Reply #84 on: June 22, 2013, 05:31 PM »

Nice flying!  I think you were having more fun than anyone else on the hill today!  Smiley. Nice glider, the best I've seen.
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Doug S
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« Reply #85 on: June 22, 2013, 05:35 PM »

sugarbaker,

Thank you for the feedback and I am glad you are having fun with the Rapere!  It is a very addicting kite and has a place when the wind is very light to nonexistent.  To help you, I have some trimming and flying suggestions:

1.  Make sure there is camber (curved sail) in the rear sail.  Just move the front line back until there is a decent camber.  When assembled, place a ruler under the rear sail along the center, from front to rear, and the sail surface about 1/3 the way back from the front should be about 1 ¼ to 1 3/8 inches above the ruler.  Too tight and it will not glide.  Too loose and there will be wrinkles in the sail along the center camber.

2.  With all of the nose weight, the Rapere will glide fast.  Remove the 3 in. piece and it will float more.  If you remove some of the nose weight, you will need to move the bridle line connection point back because you moved the center of gravity back.

3.  With all of the nose weight and no flying line, toss the Rapere like a paper airplane and it should glide for about 20 to 30 feet, with a very slight nose up angle.  If it stalls (nose up), add more camber to the rear sail.  At the end of the glide, it should hover into a very gentle landing.

4.  The bridle at the indicated mark makes the Rapere hot on the flying line, but very response to turns.  Move it back and it will fly more like a gentle single line kite, but be more resistant to input for turns.  With the line connected, I toss mine downwind like a paper airplane.  When it’s about 1 foot from the ground, I add a little drag to the line and the Rapere will turn.  I then pull the line in for the Rapere to climb.  Once at the top of the climb, just let the line loose, and the Rapere will soar and hunt, changing direction with every little puff of wind.

5.  The frame gets overloaded in 3 to 4 mph winds and the rear sail will dump the air and recover, causing it to pulse.  Too much wind and the Rapere will spin.  Remember, there is usually a wind gradient on the field, with stronger winds the higher you go up.  My Rapere with the thicker wall 1/8 in. frame fly’s great and can handle about 2 mph more wind than the one with the thin wall tubes.  The weight increase for me was only 3.9 grams (8.2 %).  Just remember to add the extra layers of reinforcements to the attachment points for the 4 locations on the rear sail, and the nose of the front sail, which is indicated in the updated version of the plan top view.  It did this on both versions of my Rapere.

By the way, the smaller version the Rapere is just as much fun to fly, and with only 6 panels, it’s faster to build.

Thank you again and please keep posting you experience,

Doug
« Last Edit: June 30, 2013, 07:25 PM by Doug S » Logged

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sugarbaker
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« Reply #86 on: June 23, 2013, 07:55 AM »

What you describe is pretty much identical to my experience yesterday. (Though I achieved my results by trial and error).  I think I might build a small rapere, but my first priority is to fly the one I have on longer line... I only had about 70 feet when I was at the field yesterday.  Thanks again, and I'll just add another plug to anyone on the fence about building on; it is a challenging kite to build that yields excellent reward and fun!
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« Reply #87 on: June 23, 2013, 01:42 PM »

so, todays experience was fun, but I stumbled on to something new.  There was no wind and yet the Rapere would only just sit in place... rather than glide forward when I put slack on the line (keep in mind I reassembled the kite and lost some of the settings I had tuned in yesterday).  The other odd character was that when I had tension on the line to help the kite climb, it would swing back and forth... unlike yesterday in which it would climb with a pretty direct heading and then come to a glide when I let some slack into the line.  Any thoughts?  Perhaps I had too much camber in the rear sail?  I had to re-tie the bridle tow point as the prusik was coming unlocked and slipping.  I retied it with a triple loop prusik and that seemed to fix the problem.  Thanks for your thoughts!  (I still love this thing!)
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Doug S
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« Reply #88 on: June 23, 2013, 04:10 PM »

sugarbaker,

Check the glide without the flying line. If you have the front adjustment on the rear sail too tight, the angle between the front and rear sails becomes too much, which will prevent a reasonable glide.  Without the spreader installed at the tips of the rear sail, the center of the rear sail should have almost no tension between the front and rear of the sail connection points.

Once you have gotten the glide adjusted, then add the flying line.  If it's swinging on the line (going left and right), then move the tow point back a little.

Let me know if that works,

Doug
« Last Edit: June 30, 2013, 07:25 PM by Doug S » Logged

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« Reply #89 on: June 23, 2013, 04:19 PM »

I'll give it a shot the next time I'm out.  Thanks!
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